Territory Stories

Debates Day 5 - 31 October 2018

Details:

Title

Debates Day 5 - 31 October 2018

Other title

Parliamentary Record 15

Collection

Debates for 13th Assembly 2016 - 2018; ParliamentNT; Parliamentary Record; 13th Assembly 2016 - 2020

Date

2018-10-31

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Language

English

Subject

Debates

Publisher name

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/304284

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/363749

Page content

DEBATES Wednesday 31 October 2018 4779 With such a rapid rate of change, we need to focus on the ability to be nimble and support young people who will have multiple jobs across multiple areas. Gateway jobs, where you started at a company and worked your way up, are not available anymore. You need to have specific skill sets to meet specific requirements, which change on a regular basis. I support these broad changes to ensure flexibility. The Territorys economy is diversifying in a way we could not have foreseen, such as the opportunity presented by the space industry. This opportunity is extraordinary, developing unexpected jobs. We need to ensure we have people to lead workforce training to provide for these new and exciting work opportunities. In my other role as Minister for Renewables and Essential Services, one of the exciting opportunities we have is to be a world leader in the development of solar energy technology. The Intyalheme Centre run by Desert Knowledge Australia is about the practical application of research in the context of the Northern Territory. We need to look what skills development can be done to ensure the best possible outcome. I met with a group this morning regarding working toward zero emissions. This is a fast-moving area, with plans for zero emissions within the next 10 to 20 years. This is a huge change in the way we do business. As a government we are firmly committed to 50% renewable power by 2030. Ultimately, we will need to invest in skills and research to achieve this, including reskilling our power workers in the traditional system. Moving through this rapid change, how do we support people to transition from one job to another? Ideas around transition are an important part of workforce training. There is an unpredictability to this change. I commend the minister for her work in this area. She has come into the portfolio running and with her sneakers on. Minister Lawler has provided a strong base from which to move forward. This is a positive step towards meeting our need for a wide range of input into our workforce training, particularly as this government diversifies the economy, which is extremely important. We cannot underestimate the value of a job that you value, feel skilled in and feel a sense of achievement in. Training can provide people to develop their skills so that they have pride in their work and feel they are achieving something when they go to work each day. That is why youth training has to be part of this process as we move forward. One of the biggest challenges we have and receive much feedback about from the Youth Round Table which I am privileged to Chair every yearis that there is a sense among young people in the Territory that they are not seen as part of the community. The view is that youth are causing problems or are expected to be high achievers. The best way to socially include youth is to ensure that they are part of our community and economy. We need to have a skilled workforce coming through. The future of the Northern Territory economy will be dependent on growing our own skilled workforce, people who are committed to and understand the Territory. We need to make sure the best choice for our kids is not moving south. To do that we need to be extremely nimble in ensuring that we invest in young people and their training. We need to see young people as a valuable part of our community, not a group who we exclude at every opportunity or vilify through lumping kids into one group. Training is an important path to that. Training is the pathway away from a life of crime. The important way forward for the youth justice system is through training and giving kids skills so that they can be an active and important part of our community. I am very proud to talk about the training that Territory Families has been doing. We are invested in a skilled workforce. We are working with our NGOs to make sure they have the workforce to provide the services that people on the front line need. We are invested in ensuring Aboriginal voices lead the conversation regarding training needs and what training Aboriginal people need to be an important part of the workforce. This is to ensure we are not putting up further barriers for Aboriginal people to participate in the economy, but that we open those pathways through training, because a good education gives you opportunities. I thank the member for bringing this bill to the House. It is a sensible and practical move. It is getting rid of red tape and making sure we have a flexible department that can seek expertise where it needs to, including from businesses that have long-term experience and have been hiring people in the Territory for a long time. There are many skilled people in our business area who need skilled workers and whose business relies on that. We will continue to work with industry but with the flexibility to hear from a range of voices, reflecting and growing the diversity of the Northern Territory economy and making sure we have a strong view of what future training needs will be.


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