Territory Stories

Sunday Territorian 24 Aug 2014

Details:

Title

Sunday Territorian 24 Aug 2014

Collection

Sunday Territorian; NewspaperNT

Date

2014-08-24

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/252831

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/541898

Page content

SUNDAY AUGUST 24 2014 LIFESTYLE 27 V1 - NTNE01Z01MA TELE01Z01BS - V1 b+s My story10 A ustralia ranks second in the world for antidepressant prescriptions, according to a report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, which reveals that only Iceland swallows more of these pills. This means that out of a random group of 1000 Australians, 89 will be on mood-altering medication. Until three months ago, I was one of them. I had a condition for which theres medicine and I used it. Antidepressants did the job. There was never any stigma attached to either depression or antidepressants, but I wanted to be reacquainted with the old, unmedicated me the guy who got me into this in the first place to see if there was another way to combat what I called my black cashmere. Depressives are champions of the metaphor; fog is always popular, but I chose mine because its dark and inviting to sink into as you know things just couldnt get worse. After a chat with my GP, we decided on a tapering program, in which one tablet a day would become a half, then a quarter, then nothing over a period of three months. Different antidepressants take different amounts of time to leave the body, and at first the symptoms were mostly physical. Dizziness and a faint nausea shadowed me. It was four weeks of the feeling you get when you stand up too quickly. While not pleasant, I figured that if this was the worst of it then Id be OK. It wasnt and I wasnt. Comedian and writer David Smiedt, 46, shares the emotional roller-coaster ride of parting ways with mood-balancing pills in an effort to rediscover his unmedicated self Emotional ovErload Within a month, the emotional ramifications announced themselves in a teary, snot-filled avalanche. To borrow a phrase from This is Spinal Tap, my sensitivities were turned up to 11. Will Ferrell movies were funnier than they had any right to be and the part of my brain that regulated feelings couldnt tell the difference between Sophies Choice and bank ads. Awful events on the news affected me viscerally, but then so did things on uplifting sites such as upworthy.com. While this phase had its challenges, for better or worse, it was all me. There have been plenty of days when Ive wondered if coming off antidepressants was an enormous mistake, days when Ive barely opened my eyes before the internal voice that every depressive knows whispers, Morning, youre still shit at everything. So far, Ive managed to resist the siren song of the tablets in the medicine cabinet. I want to see if I have the wherewithal to respond to my triggers an unkind word, an unreturned text, something someone said 22 years ago that still stings in a more holistic, self-sufficient way. I also decided to grow a beard, which is neither here nor there but I figure that the itching on my face may be a pleasant distraction from the itching on my soul. Once a week I chat to a psychologist, who keeps me on the path between healthy expression and mordant wallowing. Its hugely cathartic, but I struggle with the idea that its all a bit self-indulgent and I should harden up. After all, there are so many people worse off than me who deal with life so much better. And this is depressions most insidious venom its the only disease that makes you feel guilty for contracting it. Which brings me to now. Some days are better than others and I think Ive done the right thing by going off the tablets, but Im not 100 per cent convinced. Maybe in a year Ill be telling people about the time I tried to give up the pills. All I know is that right now Im doing OK without a pharmaceutical barrier between me and the world. Or to put it in Instagram terms, no filter. finding a way back The Royal College of Psychiatrists has this advice for anyone who wants to come off medication: l A doctors input is crucial. Having to stay on medication doesnt make you a failure. 2 Be aware that the condition you originally took medication for could return. 3 Pick a time when you have less stressors and create a plan to taper the medication. 4 Tell family and friends so you have a support network. 5 It can help to exercise more or try treatments such as cognitive behavioural therapy. For more info, visit rcpsych.ac.uk After seven years on antidepressants this is what it feels like to be med-free See whos been out and about in the Territory in YourScene, every Tuesday in the NT News. Were you spotted? TELE01Z01BS - V1 b+s My story10 A ustralia ranks second in the world for antidepressant prescriptions, according to a report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, which reveals that only Iceland swallows more of these pills. This means that out of a random group of 1000 Australians, 89 will be on mood-altering medication. Until three months ago, I was one of them. I had a condition for which theres medicine and I used it. Antidepressants did the job. There was never any stigma attached to either depression or antidepressants, but I wanted to be reacquainted with the old, unmedicated me the guy who got me into this in the first place to see if there was another way to combat what I called my black cashmere. Depressives are champions of the metaphor; fog is always popular, but I chose mine because its dark and inviting to sink into as you know things just couldnt get worse. After a chat with my GP, we decided on a tapering program, in which one tablet a day would become a half, then a quarter, then nothing over a period of three months. Different antidepressants take different amounts of time to leave the body, and at first the symptoms were mostly physical. Dizziness and a faint nausea shadowed me. It was four weeks of the feeling you get when you stand up too quickly. While not pleasant, I figured that if this was the worst of it then Id be OK. It wasnt and I wasnt. Comedian and writer David Smiedt, 46, shares the emotional roller-coaster ride of parting ways with mood-balancing pills in an effort to rediscover his unmedicated self Emotional ovErload Within a month, the emotional ramifications announced themselves in a teary, snot-filled avalanche. To borrow a phrase from This is Spinal Tap, my sensitivities were turned up to 11. Will Ferrell movies were funnier than they had any right to be and the part of my brain that regulated feelings couldnt tell the difference between Sophies Choice and bank ads. Awful events on the news affected me viscerally, but then so did things on uplifting sites such as upworthy.com. While this phase had its challenges, for better or worse, it was all me. There have been plenty of days when Ive wondered if coming off antidepressants was an enormous mistake, days when Ive barely opened my eyes before the internal voice that every depressive knows whispers, Morning, youre still shit at everything. So far, Ive managed to resist the siren song of the tablets in the medicine cabinet. I want to see if I have the wherewithal to respond to my triggers an unkind word, an unreturned text, something someone said 22 years ago that still stings in a more holistic, self-sufficient way. I also decided to grow a beard, which is neither here nor there but I figure that the itching on my face may be a pleasant distraction from the itching on my soul. Once a week I chat to a psychologist, who keeps me on the path between healthy expression and mordant wallowing. Its hugely cathartic, but I struggle with the idea that its all a bit self-indulgent and I should harden up. After all, there are so many people worse off than me who deal with life so much better. And this is depressions most insidious venom its the only disease that makes you feel guilty for contracting it. Which brings me to now. Some days are better than others and I think Ive done the right thing by going off the tablets, but Im not 100 per cent convinced. Maybe in a year Ill be telling people about the time I tried to give up the pills. All I know is that right now Im doing OK without a pharmaceutical barrier between me and the world. Or to put it in Instagram terms, no filter. finding a way back The Royal College of Psychiatrists has this advice for anyone who wants to come off medication: l A doctors input is crucial. Having to stay on medication doesnt make you a failure. 2 Be aware that the condition you originally took medication for could return. 3 Pick a time when you have less stressors and create a plan to taper the medication. 4 Tell family and friends so you have a support network. 5 It can help to exercise more or try treatments such as cognitive behavioural therapy. For more info, visit rcpsych.ac.uk After seven years on antidepressants this is what it feels like to be med-free body+soul www.bodyandsoul.com.au


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

We use temporary cookies on this site to provide functionality.
By continuing to use this site without changing your settings, you consent to our use of cookies.