Territory Stories

1908 Talbot, model type 4T was nicknamed ‘474’

Details:

Title

1908 Talbot, model type 4T was nicknamed ‘474’

Other title

Gaynor Lovett

Photographer

Lovett, Gaynor

Photo number

PH0836/0006

Collection

Off the Beaten Track Collection.; PictureNT; PictureNT

Date

2008-08-20

Location

Darwin

Description

1908 Dutton – Aunger, Talbot, model type 4T was nicknamed ‘474’ (it’s SA Registration Number). It was built by Clement Talbot Limited in London, it has a 4 cylinder 25 hp motor, weighed 1280kg and had a wheelbase of 9ft 8in and a track of 4ft. 7in. It had a cruising speed of around 75km/h (45mph).

Notes

20 August 1908, when Harry Dutton and Murray Aunger drove into Darwin, they had made history as the first people to drive across the Australian continent. They had set out on their journey 51days earlier on the 30th June 1908 from Adelaide. It was a remarkable feat considering that they crossed deserts, negotiated creeks and rivers and even escaped a bushfire in their 25hp Talbot. In fifty one days the car traveled 3250 kilometers (2100 miles) with an average daily distance of 64 kilometers per day. Incredibly, the car only suffered three punctures over the entire journey. One Hundred years later '474' did the trip in style on board a trailer.

Subject

parliamentary buildings; motor vehicles; Talbot (cars)

Digital format

72ppi ; 14.5Mb.

Format

1 photograph : digital, col. ; 92 x 69 cm.

File type

image/tiff.

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Library & Archives NT

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Related links

http://motor.history.sa.gov.au/collections/veteran-vehicles/talbot; http://motor.history.sa.gov.au/collections/veteran-vehicles/talbot [Off the beaten track]

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/179696

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/179696

Related items

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/717068


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

We use temporary cookies on this site to provide functionality.
By continuing to use this site without changing your settings, you consent to our use of cookies.