Territory Stories

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Details:

Title

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Other title

Tabled Paper 1123

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2003-10-16

Description

Tabled by Delia Lawrie

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/307061

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/346011

Page content

Threatened Species Network Alice Springs Written Submissions Cane Toad Inquiry Report Volume 2 134 RECOMMENDATION 2 That the NT government invests resources into rigorous monitoring programs to study both the short- and long-term impacts of cane toad invasion on a wide range of native species Currently there are few monitoring programs in place to assess the short- or longterm impacts of cane toad invasion on mainland biodiversity, or their impacts on species that are important to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people either for cultural reasons or as a food resource. The absence of data on these impacts means that it is very difficult to predict likely biodiversity trends attributable to toad invasion, identify habitats at risk, calculate the environmental cost of toad invasions, or to assess the economic impact on native species valued by indigenous communities. RECOMMENDATION 3 That the NT government invests considerably more resources into recovery programs for native fauna likely to be significantly impacted on by cane toad invasion Preliminary data from biodiversity monitoring programs in Kakadu NP show that there are several species, including the Northern Quoll, which undergo rapid and significant population decline as cane toads invade their habitat. For species determined to be at risk of local extinction, or serious decline, it will be necessary to implement recovery programs aimed at securing populations of these species in habitats protected from invading cane toads. Because of the speed at which cane toad invasion is progressing through habitats in mainland NT, it is important to ensure that the necessary at-risk species recovery planning and funding strategies are in place within a very short timeframe to ensure effective implementation of these recovery programs. I would be happy to expand on any of these issues should you require it. Yours sincerely, Colleen O'Malley


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