Territory Stories

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Details:

Title

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Other title

Tabled Paper 1123

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2003-10-16

Description

Tabled by Delia Lawrie

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/307061

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/346011

Page content

Written Submissions Dr Mahony Volume 2 Cane Toad Inquiry Report 169 SUBMISSION NO. 23 Dr Michael Mahony, University of Newcastle, New South Wales michael.mahony@newcastle.edu.au 29 May 2003 Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Dear Committee I am a biologist at the University of Newcastle NSW. In the early 1990s I proposed a bio-control method for Cane Toads to the CSIRO Cane Toad control committee. At that time they were heavily committed to finding a disease to control toads. The approach I proposed is rather unique and I consider has as many chances of success as the other methods proposed then and currently under investigation. I am critically aware that there is not likely to be one silver bullet that will solve the problem of the cane toad and I am not about to claim that the approach I put forward is guaranteed to work. There is considerable research to be completed, but I believe it has possibilities. I have attached a user-friendly outline of the concept. If you would like more details I would be happy to provide them. Sincerely Dr Michael Mahony CONTROL OF CANE TOADS BY THE STERILE MALE APPROACH Background The release of Sterile Males to control populations is one approach that has proven to be successful in a small number of cases involving insects. The concept is based on the principle that any control method must be specific to the organism that is targeted. A feature that is specific to any organism is that males and females mate only with members of their own species. If there is a means by which the majority of males can be rendered sterile then most matings will fail to produce offspring. This method has been most effectively applied to insects (e.g. screw worm fly, mosquitoes). The general approach is to swamp a population with sterile males so that the eggs of females will not be effectively fertilised. This method works most effectively in organisms that are not highly mobile, where reproduction is restricted to one copulation, where reproductive potential is high, and the life cycle relatively short. The method has not been applied to vertebrate pests because they often do not meet these criteria. However, the Cane Toad meets some of these criteria. It has a high reproductive potential, copulation, as far


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