Territory Stories

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Details:

Title

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Other title

Tabled Paper 1123

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2003-10-16

Description

Tabled by Delia Lawrie

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/307061

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/346011

Page content

Written Submissions Parks & Wildlife Commission NT Volume 2 Cane Toad Inquiry Report 19 because theyre counterbalanced so, I mean you can think of things like this it is perfectly possible, you know you talk of youve got enough talent around, enough people who know what theyre doing and you stick them in a room and say invent something, theyll probably come out with some idea. But this all comes back to this you know consolidation and getting the right people in the group you know. Madam CHAIR: Which is where were very keen to have any suggestions you have on that come back to us because I know its something that you want to take some contemplation about. Getting back to humane ways of disposals, some people have said that a popular thing has been Dettol in a watering spray. Whats your opinion? Dr WOINARSKI: Very painful. Dr LAWSON: Yeah we actually did some searching around for that and the consensus from the people that had looked at that was that it was an extremely painful way to kill the toads. Dr WOINARSKI: If they had a voice you could hear them. Dr LAWSON: And in fact we recommended just a few weeks ago, someone sent us a letter saying would we advocate this and we said: no we would not. Madam CHAIR: So youd advocate the freezer option, the fridge/freezer option and thats it? Dr LAWSON: More or less, yeah. Mr BALDWIN: Or an injection by a vet. Madam CHAIR: The vets are already going to make a packet out of the dogs and cats. Dr LAWSON: And if you did that youd have an influx of vets to the Territory, I tell you, very quickly. Mr BALDWIN: Can I get back to baseline data? Taking the discussion back a little bit, thats one of the things thats missing in the whole sort of debate on cane toads, you know, Queensland, 70 years of cane toads never did much in the early days. Youre saying that well have a much better picture but are we doing scientific type baseline observations so that we can go back and post observations then and the preobservations and post toad, so that we can go back and do the counts on the ground and all that sort of thing to see which animals have been affected? Or are we just doing from our general quantum of information in the Territory that well have a look afterwards and see if its changed. How are we doing it, what are we scientifically?


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