Territory Stories

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Details:

Title

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Other title

Tabled Paper 1123

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2003-10-16

Description

Tabled by Delia Lawrie

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/307061

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/346011

Page content

Parks & Wildlife Commission NT Written Submissions Cane Toad Inquiry Report Volume 2 36 d. Initiation of discussions with the Aboriginal owners of long-term management of the islands for conservation purposes. This may be some form of protected status (National Park or Indigenous Protected Area) acceptable to the owners or some other management arrangement. Public education Learning to live with toads There will be considerable public disquiet about the arrival of toads in Darwin. It would be appropriate that there is a substantial communication effort to anticipate this interest. The Parks and Wildlife Commission, Parks Australia, the Tiwi and Northern Land Councils, and Frogwatch have provided some communication material about toads and their impacts. This should be updated and include details on: the difficulty of control; the long term nature of the development of possible control measures; how to fence a swimming pool or a bush block to exclude cane toads; how to minimise food resources for them e.g. minimise area of green lawns, do not use outside lights at night; the most humane and efficacious procedures for killing toads; and information about their impacts upon biodiversity. Impacts upon traditional Aboriginal lifestyle While there is little that can be done to alleviate this problem, it is important that the issue is at least recognised. A response should be considered in collaboration with the Northern, Tiwi and Andilyakwa Land Councils. Appropriate education material should be produced in the relevant local language. REFERENCES Sutherst, R.W., Floyd, R.B. and Maywold, G.F. (1996). The potential geographical distribution of the cane toad, Bufo marinus L. in Australia. Conserv. Biol. 9: 294-299. -van Dam, R.A., Walden, D.J. and Begg, G.W. (2002). A preliminary risk assessment of cane toads in Kakadu National Park. Supervising Scientist. Scientific report 164.


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