Territory Stories

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Details:

Title

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Other title

Tabled Paper 1123

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2003-10-16

Description

Tabled by Delia Lawrie

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/307061

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/346011

Page content

Written Submissions ERISS Kakadu Report 2002 Volume 2 Cane Toad Inquiry Report 39 SUBMISSION NO. 3B Preliminary Risk Assessment of Cane Toads in Kakadu National Park, 2002 Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist R A van Dam, D Walden and G Begg National Centre for Tropical Wetland Research Provided by Dr Max Finlayson EXTRACT ONLY For a full copy of Report contact ERISS e-mail: publications@eriss.erin.gov.au lnternet: http://www.ea.gov.au/ssd/index.html Full citation: van Dam RA, Walden DJ & Begg GW 2002. A preliminary risk assessment of cane toads in Kakadu National Park. Scientist Report 164, Supervising Scientist, Darwin NT. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Background and approach Cane toads (Bufo marinus) entered the Northern Territory (N'T) in 1980 from Queensland and are rapidly approaching Kakadu National Park (KNP), having recently been reported in the upper Mann River and Snowdrop Creek, approximately 15-30 km to the east of Kakadu National Park. Concern about the invasion of cane toads in Kakadu National Park has been highlighted on a number of occasions, and in 1998 participants at a workshop on the potential impacts and control of cane toads in Kakadu National Park conceded that a strategic approach for assessing and possibly minimising cane toad impacts should be developed. The first stage would be an ecological risk assessment to predict the likely extent of impacts of cane toads in Kakadu National Park and identify key vulnerable habitats and species. This information could be used to develop new monitoring programs and assess existing ones. This assessment is a direct result of Environment Australia's concern about the potential impacts of cane toads in Kakadu National Park. The wetland risk assessment framework developed by ERISS for the Ramsar Convention was used to predict key habitats and the species most at risk. The majority of the assessment involved identifying the problem, the potential extent and effects of the problem, the risk, and subsequently making recommendations on monitoring. Major information gaps relevant to predicting impacts and developing appropriate monitoring programs were also identified. The risk assessment was based on information from published and unpublished scientific and anecdotal reports. Information on Kakadu National Park was derived from relevant research projects undertaken in the Park since the early 1980s. A number of relevant Territory and Commonwealth agencies were consulted, as were relevant cane toad, native fauna and/or wildlife management experts from around Australia. Discussions were held with community members in the Borroloola and Mataranka regions to gain an indigenous/cultural perspective of the cane toad issue.


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