Territory Stories

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Details:

Title

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Other title

Tabled Paper 1123

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2003-10-16

Description

Tabled by Delia Lawrie

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/307061

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/346011

Page content

Written Submissions ERISS PAN Report 2002 Volume 2 Cane Toad Inquiry Report 49 SUBMISSION NO. 3C Report ERISS/ PAN Cane Toad Risk Assessment Katherine/ Mataranka and Borroloola Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist G Begg, D Walden and J Rovis-Hermann, 2002 EXTRACT ONLY For a full copy of Report contact ERISS e-mail: publications@eriss.erin.gov.au lnternet: http://www.ea.gov.au/ssd/index.html INTRODUCTION In May 2000, while cane toads (plate 1) were known to be rapidly approaching the borders of the Kakadu National Park (KNP), a joint Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist ERISS/Parks Australia North (PAN) field trip was undertaken to obtain information about: how the presence of cane toads has affected the lives of Aboriginal communities; visitor perceptions about cane toads; the impact of cane toads in nature reserves such as the Elsey National Park; and the diet of cane toads (by obtaining a sample of cane toads from the Mataranka region). The group consisted of Jacqui Rovis-Hermann, Dave Walden and George Begg (from ERISS) and Kathy Wilson, Beryl Smith and Ryan Barrawei (both Jawoyn Traditional Owners (TOs) for southern Kakadu) from PAN. CONCLUSIONS In spite of a decline in a number of some traditional bushfoods, the lifestyles of Aboriginal communities do not appear to be seriously disadvantaged by the presence of cane toads. Nevertheless, the negative effects of cane toads can be sufficient for cultura1 and religious ceremonies of Aboriginal communities to be changed. As proved to be the case in Queensland, Aboriginal people eventually grow accustomed to the presence of cane toads and, in the realisation that little can be done to control or eliminate them, come to accept the need to co-exist. For a period of 4-5 years certain species of goannas and snakes are likely to be adversely affected. Their decline will negatively affect Aboriginal communities that are semi-dependent on their availability as a food supply. The mowed lawns, sprinkler systems, shaded gardens, swimming pools, playing fields, sewage treatment ponds and street lighting in the township of Jabiru will offer ideal conditions for cane toads. The lifestyles of people resident in the township can be expected to be significantly affected and there will be a high risk of household pets (dogs) becoming poisoned. Disturbed areas in the KNP such as caravan parks and camping grounds will be similarly affected. RECOMMENDATIONS It is recommended that once the cane toad risk assessment is complete:


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