Territory Stories

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Details:

Title

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Other title

Tabled Paper 1123

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2003-10-16

Description

Tabled by Delia Lawrie

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/307061

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/346011

Page content

ERISS PAN Report 2002 Written Submissions Cane Toad Inquiry Report Volume 2 50 PAN/ERISS finalise a communication strategy to inform interested and affected parties about the potential impact of the cane toads in the KNP. This would avoid misinformation, unnecessary concern and be in keeping with the 'early invasion response strategy' currently being established by EA (Greg Miles, Jabiru Rag 18.5.00). immediate attention is given to designing a cane toad monitoring program aimed at key species (e.g. Varanus spp) and key habitats (e.g. riparian zones). OUTCOMES In the latter part of 2000, cane toad identification and information sessions were conducted jointly by KNP and ERISS staff. Target audiences included KNP staff, Energy Resources of Australia staff, tourist operators (including hotel/caravan park/tourist village staff) and Aboriginal communities. People were briefed on all aspects of cane toad impacts and the identification of cane toads, including the eggs and tadpoles. Park managers have continued to inform these groups and the general public of the locations of cane toads, their impacts and what action to take if cane toads are sighted outside of their present distribution i.e. as part of the 'early invasion response strategy'. Posters, bulletins and items in the local media and tourism newsletters all contribute to this education and awareness program. A cane toad 'flipbook' has also been prepared for Aboriginal communities. By the time of this report, cane toads were well established in some southern areas of the Park such as Kambolgie Creek, the Gunlom area and the upper Mary River catchment. An autopsy on a freshwater crocodile found dead in Kambolgie Creek during February 2002, revealed that gastric haemorrhages consistent with violent stomach contractions were probably caused by ingestion of a cane toad (Northern Territory News 19 March 2002).


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

We use temporary cookies on this site to provide functionality.
By continuing to use this site without changing your settings, you consent to our use of cookies.