Territory Stories

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Details:

Title

Sessional Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development Written Submissions Received Volume 2 Issues associated with the progressive entry into the Northern Territory of Cane Toads October 2003

Other title

Tabled Paper 1123

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2003-10-16

Description

Tabled by Delia Lawrie

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/307061

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/346011

Page content

Mr Baschiera Written Submissions Cane Toad Inquiry Report Volume 2 62 The general tendency, as demonstrated in Queensland, is to accept living with this biopollutant. To enhance this acceptance, we create anecdotal humour to help with our comfort zone, hence jokes about playing golf with toads abound. In short, the most effective defence the Cane Toad has is our acceptance of its biological dominance. This means it will spread across Northern Australia, becoming a dominant species from Kakadu to the Ord River while we turn a blind eye and not resource any research or means to combat it. The cane toad is an insidious menace that could drastically alter the quality of our future and natural environment. WHAT CAN WE DO? 1. Help Wildcare petition the government and industry to fund $millions into open ended research on the toad. To look at al angles, biological, genetic, pathogens etc. 2. Alert community to slow the spread. The frontline has passed Katherine and is already in the lower parts of Kakadu. 3. Report any suspected sightings of cane toads. Do not kill them but capture them for identification as young toads are difficult to distinguish from the native Uperoleiea species. 4. Turn you gardens into Cane Toad-free sanctuaries in order to protect the genetic pool contained there in and buy time for science to come up with a solution. Fencing using 1cm hole bird wire at a height of 50cm should be sufficient. 5. Let the world know that the World Heritage Values of Kakadu are under dire threat. 6. Change community attitude from one of acceptance to one of resistance, we have to turn and fight the toad now. Written by Dan Baschiera BA Sc. prior eco-tourism operator/ lecturer and research consultant to the NT Government. This campaign is funded by donations to Wildcare Inc. Wildcare is a non-profit organisation run by volunteers. Donations or enquiries can be directed to PO Box 464, Palmerston NT 0831


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