Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Fri 30 Mar 2018

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Fri 30 Mar 2018

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2018-03-30

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C01285

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/299216

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/384953

Page content

16 LETTERS THURSDAY MARCH 29 2018 CAVE01Z01MA - V1 Phillip Alice, you champion PHILLIP Alice, what an outstanding role model and charismatic man. I was cheering when I read in your Friday issue he wanted to be back in uniform. This is what we need, community-proud indigenous men and women with connection to country who want to see these kids prosper and thrive, to give them the kind of childhood every kid has the right too. Earlier this year Phillip was working hard to create a proactive group of elders and respected people from OUR communities, to help reach out to the kids who stroll the town at night. Goodluck Phillip: we need humble, strong people like you and Jacinta to make a difference for our kids, our communities and our town. Katie Bromley Good stand on fracking THIS is just a quick note to say good on you for coming out and supporting a ban on Bottle shop police are a waste WHY do we need to spend 12 million dollars on 75 police auxiliaries to stand at bottle shops to check IDs when bottle shop staff are scanning IDs? Robyn Lambley points out in No easy answer to booze issue (Advocate 20/3/18) that the role of the police officers at PoSIs is to check IDs to determine whether the person lives at a location where they are not allowed to drink. If so, they are banned from purchasing alcohol. Why cant this information be entered into the BDR database so that a single scan by bottle shop staff will cover both those with alcohol-related convictions as well as those whose address is a location where alcohol cannot be consumed? The BDR in Alice Springs currently has only 500 names on it, but the inclusion of nondrinking addresses would increase that number many fold, making he BDR considerably more effective in curbing alcohol-fuelled violence at considerably less cost. Jerome Quote of the Day I have to be sent back to the Alice Springs hospital and then theyll decide when I can be let loose on to the community again. C E N T R A L I A N A D V O C A T E J O U R N A L I S T S T E V E M E N Z I E S What are your plans for the Easter long weekend? My Dad is coming up from Mt Gambier so Ill be spending time with him. We might go to the rodeo. KRISTY MCINTYRE Im going to the Easter celebration at my church. We have crusade meetings at an Aboriginal community, so itll be an exciting weekend. ANDREW KINGSTON Ill be up in Darwin spending time with the kids. Ill probably try to sneak in a bit of fishing, seeing as youre meant to eat fish during Easter. DEREK HUNT Im doing the Easter in the Alice mountain bike ride as a volunteer. Three days in a row so that should keep me busy. RUSSELL NORTH letters@aliceadvocate.com.au A different way to spend govt money SANTA Teresa opened a hair salon recently to cater for its population. Local Member Chansey Paech calls it a logical move. All right, you look at it this way this is a community with x amount of people. What services do we need here that youd have in a normal town this size? And I think that in other towns this size they have hairdresser salons, they have all those services, he says. So its a win for the people of Santa Teresa. But theres a backstory to this, and its a very interest ing one. The way local community projects are initiated and seeded in Santa Teresa is different from the norm. The Atyenhenge-Atherre Aboriginal Corporation is funded by the Stronger Communities for Children which is a part of the indigenous Advancement Strategy of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. What essentially happens is that the local community members have control over what projects they want and are not dictated to by outsiders. This means as youd expect the money goes to where it needs to go. Who knows better the needs of a community than the community members themselves? We understand this is a trial system which has only been rolled out in around 10 communities. The core priority of the strategy is to build Santa Teresa up into a state of self-sustainability through initiatives like the hair salon. There are other projects underway also that are having a positive effect in the community. The end goal is to remove the Centrelink office a lofty goal, to be sure, but a worthy one. 6 14,498km 11mYEARS of Blacken Open Air, a heavy music festi-val in Alice Springs THE flight between Perth and London, as undertaken by the Qantas Indigenous Dreamliner THE number of people worldwide who have seen Menopause The Musical 2 Gap Road, Alice Springs PO Box 2254, Alice Springs 0870 Phone: (08) 8950 9777 Fax: (08) 8950 9740 www.alicenow.com.au CONTACT DETAILS EMAIL ADDRESSES News: news@aliceadvocate.com.au Letters: letters@aliceadvocate.com.au Sport: sport@aliceadvocate.com.au Display ads: ads@aliceadvocate.com.au Classifieds: cenclassies@aliceadvocate.com.au Editor: David Lornie Features Editor: Steve Menzies Sports Editor: Anthony Geppa Sales Manager: Lisa Nadan Editorial content and election comment is authorised by Matt Williams of Printers Place, McMinn Street, Darwin. fracking. I, too, am opposed to fracking for the reasons you outline in Fridays editorial: the risks to our precious water; the industrialisation of our Territory landscape; the huge amounts of water used in the fracking process, and the pumping of chemicals down past our aquifers. Let alone the health risks, the uncertain economic benefits and the contribution to global warming. The benefits are dubious, the risks are too many and investing in an industry that adds to our carbon emission load is, in the 21st century, highly questionable. Its a no-brainer -- NO to fracking. Good on the Advocate for seeing the obvious and speaking out. Dianna Newham Phillip Alice, a strong community leader.


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