Territory Stories

Ministerial Statement Greenhouse effect

Details:

Title

Ministerial Statement Greenhouse effect

Other title

Tabled Paper 999

Collection

Tabled Papers for 5th Assembly 1987 - 1990; Tabled Papers; ParliamentNT

Date

1989-08-29

Description

Tabled by Marshall Perron

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2021C00044

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/298433

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/387330

Page content

EFFORTS TO PROTECT OUR ENDANGERED BILBY ARE ALSO BEGINNING TO BEAR FRUIT. THE BILBY, OR RABBIT-EARED BANDICOOT, WAS ONCE FOUND OVER MUCH OF MAINLAND AUSTRALIA BUT IS NOW MAINLY CONFINED TO THE TANAMI DESERT. THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION HAS SUCCESSIVELY BRED THE BILBY IN CAPTIVITY AT THE ARID ZONE RESEARCH INSTITUTE IN ALICE SPRINGS, AND SURPLUS BILBIES ARE NOW BEING RE-INTRODUCED IN WATARRKA NATIONAL PARK. THERE THEY ARE BREEDING WELL AND HAVE MOVED OUT ACROSS A 10 SQUARE KILOMETRE AREA. A SIMILAR PROGRAM HAS BEEN STARTED FOR THE MALA, OR RUFOUS HARE-WALLABY, WHICH IS PERILOUSLY CLOSE TO EXTINCTION. THERE ARE NOW ONLY 20 TO 30 OF THESE ANIMALS LEFT IN THE WILD, YET THEY ONCE COVERED A QUARTER OF MAINLAND AUSTRALIA. CAPTIVE-BRED MALAS ARE BEING RE-INTRODUCED INTO ABORIGINAL LAND IN THE TANAMI DESERT, AND THERE ARE PROMISING INDICATIONS THAT THIS CO-OPERATIVE PROJECT BETWEEN THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION AND THE WALPIRI PEOPLE WILL BE SUCCESSFUL. THE WISE UTILISATION OF OUR NATURAL WILDLIFE CAN AND SHOULD ENSURE CONSERVATION. THE MOST OBVIOUS EXAMPLE OF THIS HAS BEEN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TERRITORY 1S CROCODILE FARMING INDUSTRY. THIS INDUSTRY IS NOW WELL ESTABLISHED, AND AT THE SAME TIME THE WILD CROCODILE POPULATION HAS STEADILY RECOVERED SINCE THE 1960s WHEN NUMBERS WERE DANGEROUSLY LOW.


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