Territory Stories

Ministerial Statement Kava Licensing Issues

Details:

Title

Ministerial Statement Kava Licensing Issues

Other title

Tabled paper 2012

Collection

Tabled Papers for 8th Assembly 1997 - 2001; Tabled Papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2000-08-09

Description

Tabled by Timothy Baldwin

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/296004

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/394254

Page content

12 Following a submission from the NT in 1995 requesting the removal of kava from the prohibited botanical list, a two year inquiry process by the Commonwealth has resulted in the inclusion of kava in the Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulations and the development of a new Food Standard 010. This standard requires health warning labelling on all packaging with the sale and distribution of kava subject to the National Code of Kava Management. On 8 October 1997, the amendment to Schedule 4 of the Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulations was gazetted. This means anyone seeking to import kava under the protocol given in the National Code of Kava Management will need an import licence. Mail order kava has been prohibited. The one exception as I mentioned earlier is that travellers over the age of 18 years arriving in Australia will be permitted up to 2 kilograms as personal baggage. To quote the Federal Minister for Customs and Consumer Affairs when he announced the prohibition on kava in October, the allowance had been made which would ensure travellers could bring with them small qualities of kava for personal use. This recognised kavas cultural significance among some people. For all but a very few people in Arnhem Land - or elsewhere in the Territory for that matter - kava has no cultural significance.


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