Territory Stories

Mount Peake Project

Details:

Title

Mount Peake Project

Other title

Notice of Intent - Mount Peake; Statement of Reasons - Mount Peake; Terms of Reference for the preparation of an EIS - Mount Peake; Notice of Intent variation - Mount Peake; Draft EIS - Mount Peake; Addendum to Draft EIS - Mount Peake; Supplement to Draft EIS - Mount Peake

Creator

GHD Pty Ltd; Animal Plant Mineral Pty Ltd; Australian Museum Consulting

Issued by

Northern Territory Environment Protection Authority

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT

Date

2013-06-01

Abstract

TNG Ltd, under wholly owned subsidiary Enigma Mining Limited, is proposing to develop and operate the Mt Peake Project, a polymetallic (titanium, vanadium, iron) mine, located approximately 235 km north-northwest of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory (NT). GHD Pty Ltd (GHD) has been engaged by TNG to prepare the NOI and to progress environmental baseline studies and any approvals documentation for the Project.

Notes

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Table of contents

Mount Peake Project Notice of Intent - NOI June 2013 -- Mount Peake Statement of Reasons - SOR November 2013 -- Mount Peake Terms of Reference for the preparation of an EIS - TOR March 2013 -- Mount Peake Notice of Intent variation - NOI Variation March 2015 -- Mount Peake Project Draft EIS Vol. 1 - Draft EIS February 2016 -- Assessment Report 85 -- Mount Peake Project Draft EIS Vol. 2 Appendices A - K Draft -- Mount Peake Project Draft EIS Vol. 3 Appendix L-O - Draft -- Mount Peake Project Addendum to Draft EIS Appendix 1-10 -- Mount Peake Project Supplement to Draft EIS - April 2017 -- Mount Peake Project Addendum to the Draft EIS - November 2017

Language

English

Subject

Environmental impact statement; Environmental assessment; Iron mines and mining; Environmental aspects

Publisher name

TNG Limited

Place of publication

Subiaco

Format

Volumes : colour illustrations, colour maps ; 30 cm.

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

TNG Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00042

Related links

https://www.tngltd.com.au/project/mount-peake-v-ti-fe/ [Mount Peake V Ti Fe - TNG Limited]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396300 [Mount Peake Project Notice of Intent - NOI June 2013]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396301 [Mount Peake Statement of Reasons - SOR November 2013]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396303 [Mount Peake Terms of Reference for the preparation of an EIS - TOR March 2013]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396305 [Mount Peake Notice of Intent variation - NOI Variation March 2015]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396307 [Mount Peake Project Draft EIS Vol. 1 - Draft EIS February 2016]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396309 [Mount Peake Project Draft EIS Vol. 2 Appendices A - K Draft]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396311 [Mount Peake Project Draft EIS Vol. 3 Appendix L-O - Draft]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396314 [Mount Peake Project Supplement to Draft EIS - April 2017]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396315 [Mount Peake Project Addendum to the Draft EIS - November 2017]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396317 [Mount Peake Project Addendum to Draft EIS Appendix 1-10]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396319 [Assessment Report 85]

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/294504

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396317

Related items

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396300; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396301; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396303; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396305; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396307; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396309; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396311; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396314; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396315; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/396319

Page content

Page 2 of 3 Conservation reserves where reported: Alice Springs Telegraph Station Historical Reserve, Arltunga Historical Reserve, Davenport Range National Park, Emily and Jessie Gap Nature Park, Finke Gorge National Park, Kuyunba Conservation Reserve, Ruby Gap Nature Park, Trephina Gorge Nature Park, Watarrka National Park, West MacDonnell National Park. Known locations of the black-footed rock-wallaby. = pre 1970; = post 1970. Ecology Black-footed rock-wallabies occur in rocky outcrops and associated steep rocky slopes. They feed on grass, but some herbs and some leaves and fruits are also eaten (Eldridge and Close 1995). Though occasionally drinking when water is present they can survive without water. Water requirements are reduced by sheltering during the day in caves and under boulders where relative humidity is higher and air temperatures cooler. They usually emerge in the late afternoon or early evening to feed. After a cold night animals may bask in the sun during the early morning. Breeding is potentially continuous but may be influenced by seasonal factors. Embryonic diapause is a feature of reproduction. Conservation assessment A recent comprehensive assessment by Gibson (2000) provided strong evidence that this species retains much the same distribution in the Northern Territory as it had at the time of European settlement and that numbers in conservation reserves have remained stable or increased over the past 20 years. The extent of occurrence within the Territory is estimated at 37 000 km2 (Gibson 2000). Although populations in the extreme south of its range have declined or become locally extinct over the past 20-30 years, the species has disappeared from only 21 of 400 sites surveyed (5%) in the Territory. Further, most of these sites were small, isolated hills that supported small populations. Based on this information the black-footed rock-wallaby qualifies as Near Threatened in the Northern Territory. Threatening processes Major threats faced by isolated populations in Western Australia and South Australia and parts of the Northern Territory include predation by introduced (European fox, feral cat) and native (wedge-tailed eagle) predators, and habitat degradation caused by grazing by introduced herbivores. The decline of local populations in southern regions correlates with time of arrival of foxes after establishment of rabbits. Circumstantial evidence from work on another subspecies of the black-footed rock-wallaby in the Western Australian Wheatbelt and Rothschilds rockwallaby in the Dampier Archipelago strongly supports the contention that foxes have played a major role in the decline of the species.


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