Territory Stories

Submission Sessional Committee on the Use and Abuse of Alcohol by the Community 051 Pitjantjatjara Council Inc

Details:

Title

Submission Sessional Committee on the Use and Abuse of Alcohol by the Community 051 Pitjantjatjara Council Inc

Other title

Tabled Paper 271

Collection

Tabled Papers for 6th Assembly 1990 - 1994; Tabled Papers; ParliamentNT

Date

1991-05-09

Description

Tabled by Eric Poole

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2021C00044

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/293433

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/397589

Page content

6. Regulations under the Liquor Act should be amended to limit takeaway sales of alcohol to seven hours per day. Ill. Programs and facilities Pitjantjatjara Council recognises the pressing need for alcohol education, treatment and rehabilitation programs and facilities, both in its member communities and in its closest regional centre, Alice Springs. There is no reason that Pitjantjatjara people in the southernmost part of the Territory (or in Central Australia) should have to travel more than 1,500 kilometres to Darwin to receive education and assistance in relation to their alcohol problems. The Council therefore recommends that: 1. The N.T. Government, and where appropriate the Federal Government, provide assistance, both technical and financial, to remote Aboriginal communities in their efforts to overcome alcohol problems on an individual and community level, through appropriate education and awareness programs and through support facilities. 2. The N.T. Government, and where appropriate the Federal Government, provide immediate support for alcohol treatment and rehabilitation programs and facilities in Alice Springs to which Aboriginal people in remote communities may be referred. These services should be developed, controlled and, where possible, staffed by Aboriginal people to ensure sensitivity to traditional Aboriginal culture and values. 3. To support these programs, the N.T. Government should earmark a substantial portion of revenues collected by the Racing, Gaming and Liquor Commission by way of liquor licence and other fees for alcohol education, treatment and rehabilitation programs and facilities, particularly for Aboriginal people. Before such action is likely to be taken, however, the N.T. Government must first recognise that alcohol abuse in the Aboriginal community - as well as the wider Australian community - is not primarily a law enforcement problem but a social one, which requires a multi-faceted and, above all, a sensitive approach. 68