Territory Stories

Annual Report 2003/2004 Menzies School of Health Research

Details:

Title

Annual Report 2003/2004 Menzies School of Health Research

Other title

Tabled paper 1523

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2004-10-14

Description

Deemed

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/284218

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/409042

Page content

18 | Population Health & Chronic Diseases Division | Menzies School of Health Research 2003 Annual Report It is increasingly accepted that health and wellbeing are not merely determined by biological and genetic factors, but through a complex interaction of these factors and a range of economic, environmental and social determinants. Our research seeks to meet the growing demand from policy-makers and government bodies to build an evidence base for policy and practice. Social Determinants of Health MSHR 2003 Research & Education Report provides detail on all research projects and is available online at www.menzies.edu.au Awarded a $2.4 million grant from NHMRC to improve research into the health of Indigenous Australians. Led by Assoc Prof Joan Cunningham, this project will mentor young researchers to create a critical mass of Indigenous health specialists to advance the quality and capacity of research aimed at improving the health of Indigenous people. A report was submitted to the Australian Sports Commission identifying indicators to monitor the impact of sport and recreation programs in Indigenous communities. Indicators which reflect program viability and sustainability, community participation and health and social outcomes were developed. Data collection involving 180 participants in a study examining heavy cannabis use in two remote Aboriginal communities in Arnhem Land was completed early in 2003. Findings include diverse and dynamic patterns of substance use in the region and a recent rise in cannabis use. Education interventions are now under way with follow-up interviews of participants planned for 2004. A review of literature concerning stress in Indigenous people and people in lower socio-economic circumstances is continuing. The final report aims to identify available literature which relates specifically to stress and the development and management of chronic disease, and will summarise interventions taking place at an individual and population level. Key achievements


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