Territory Stories

Annual Report 2003/2004 Menzies School of Health Research

Details:

Title

Annual Report 2003/2004 Menzies School of Health Research

Other title

Tabled paper 1523

Collection

Tabled Papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers for 9th Assembly 2001 - 2005; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2004-10-14

Description

Deemed

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/284218

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/409042

Page content

6 | MSHR: Leaders in Indigenous, Remote & Tropical Health Research | Menzies School of Health Research 2003 Annual Report MSHR | leaders in indigenous, remote & tropical health research uring 2003 there has been much media attention on the state of health of Australians and the health system within Australia. It is not enough that Australians are living longer than ever we now expect to live long and healthy lives. Yet, while most Australians can reasonably expect to live well into their seventies and eighties, Indigenous Australians, and those living in remote communities, cannot expect such longevity. In the words of an Indigenous young person featured in an article by journalist Philip Adams: Superannuation is irrelevant to Indigenous people. We dont live that long. (The Weekend Australian Magazine, May 24-25, 2003) With our focus on Indigenous, tropical and remote health, MSHR is uniquely positioned to conduct research which can underpin improvements in the health of Indigenous people and our neighbours to the near north in countries such as Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Indonesia. Located on the Royal Darwin Hospital Campus in Darwins northern suburbs, MSHR also operates small units in Alice Springs and Gove. Since commencing operations in 1985, MSHR has developed a successful track record in producing high-quality research spanning infectious and noncommunicable diseases, the social and environmental determinants of health, health systems and information systems. We recognise the greatest health gains are to be made through exploring the intersections between priority heath issues, determinants of health, and translation of research into practice and policy. MSHR prides itself on its ability to work in close partnership with Indigenous and remote communities to ensure research projects are of priority and relevance. Through our Indigenous Forum, Indigenous staff and colleagues at MSHR are invaluable in communicating health priorities and values of Indigenous people to nonIndigenous researchers, facilitating research projects in a culturally appropriate manner, and determining how research findings can be taken back to the communities in the form of practical health benefits. * Indigenous Forum staff are employed across all divisions Director Governing Board Executive Officer Executive Administration Officer Operations Finance & Accounts Information Technology Human Resources Research Programs Chronic Diseases Social Determinants of Health Early Life Origins of Chronic Disease Community-based Interventions Environmental Health & Health Services Research Programs Ear & Respiratory Health Skin Health Malaria & International Health Melioidosis & Emerging Infectious Diseases Tropical Toxinology Corporate Services Division Population Health & Chronic Diseases Division Tropical & Emerging Infectious Diseases Division Education & Training Division Indigenous Staff Forum* Research Administration D


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

We use temporary cookies on this site to provide functionality.
By continuing to use this site without changing your settings, you consent to our use of cookies.