Territory Stories

Home internet for remote Indigenous communties. Technical report

Details:

Title

Home internet for remote Indigenous communties. Technical report

Other title

Technical Progress Report - June 2012

Creator

Crouch, Andrew

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT

Date

2014-09

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; The Home Internet Project (HIP) is a joint project between the Centre for Appropriate Technology (CAT), the Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries through the Swinburne University Institute for Social Research, and the Central Land Council. The project is focussed on three central Australian outstation communities: Kwale Kwale (40km west of Alice Springs), Mungalawurru (80km northwest of Tennant Creek) and Imangara (200km southeast of Tennant Creek). The three year project is structured in three phases: • A baseline study (this phase was completed in 2011, and the associated report • An implementation phase that included the provision of computing and Internet access facilities in community homes, and ongoing training and technical support for the residents. • A longitudinal research phase monitoring the ongoing use of the facilities, from the start of the implementation phase in mid-2011, through to mid-2014. - Introduction

Table of contents

Progress Report: Introduction -- Project technical objectives -- The operating context (geographic and physical environment, existing ICT infrastructure, human factors, policy & regulation) -- General technical requirements for the implementation project -- Technical project management -- Technology, equipment and service selection -- Implementation, including sourcing and installation -- Training and technical support -- Experience with the equipment and services -- Use of services -- Cost, technical and other barriers to take-up -- Summary of findings -- References. Technical Report: Introduction -- Project technical objectives -- The operating context -- General technical requirements for the implementation project -- Technical project management -- Technology, equipment and service selection -- Implementation, including sourcing and installation -- Training and technical support -- Experience with the equipment and services -- Use of the services -- End of project transition arrangements -- Cost, technical and administrative barriers to take-up -- Other issues -- Models for community computing and internet access -- Concluding remarks - toward a sustainable approach -- Summary of findings -- References.

Language

English

Subject

Internet and Indigenous peoples; Aboriginal Australians; Services for; Social aspects

Publisher name

Centre for Appropriate Technology

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Format

2 volumes : colour illustrations, colour maps ; 30 cm.

File type

application/pdf.

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/283992

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/410282

Related items

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/410283; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/410280

Page content

43 debit from a CAT account (as CAT is the funding recipient for this phase of the project), with normal internal approval processes for supplier account set-up and monthly payment. The services were provided with a web-based account management tool, which allowed aggregate usage of each service to be monitored at hourly, daily, and monthly intervals, and also permitted additions or changes to user email addresses where required. Tools and materials for support In most instances, support required only basic mechanical tools (screwdrivers, cordless drill, pliers), a voltmeter for testing the presence of mains voltage at power outlets, cable ties, and some cleaning materials. A stock of printer cartridges, printer paper, spare printer(s), USB headsets, mice and mouse pads, speakers, power boards, and miscellaneous power and data cables was also required and carried. Spare power tokens also proved useful. Status reporting The content filter was configured in all cases to send an email spontaneously to a support email address once on each day that the computer was connected to the Internet. For unexplained technical reasons this function only began to operate at about the end of November 2011. Nevertheless from that time onward these emails gave a useful indication of the degree of activity of each computer (and thus in their prolonged absence whether there might be some kind of problem with that connection), though not the content nor the actual extent of time connected over each day. Costs associated with training and technical support Costs for training and technical support break down into three main components, namely on- and off-site staff time, materials and travel. Staff time Training and support staff are engaged in providing support both on-site within the community, and off-site. For HIP, the average hours spent by CAT staff on training and technical support for the 26 month post-installation period amounted to 13 hours per week over the three communities including an average of 4 hours per week travel time. A total of 53 support visits were made, comprising 20 to Kwale Kwale, 16 to Imangara and 17 to Mungalawurru. It was possible to combine the implementation and support visits to Imangara and Mungalawurru on 15 occasions to reduce the cost of travel. Excluding travel time, the time expended represents 0.44 hours per week per installed computer. Materials A typical inventory of spare parts and materials carried in the support vehicle included parts identified as being required to address previously reported problems or shortages, plus a stock


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