Territory Stories

Debates Day 3 - Thursday 21 October 1993

Details:

Title

Debates Day 3 - Thursday 21 October 1993

Other title

Parliamentary Record 21

Collection

Debates for 6th Assembly 1990 - 1994; ParliamentNT; Parliamentary Record; 6th Assembly 1990 - 1994

Date

1993-10-21

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Language

English

Subject

Debates

Publisher name

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/279555

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/418727

Page content

DEBATES - Thursday 21 October 1Q93 Traditional male and female sports have persisted, with community and government support tending to favour the male sports. Encouragement needs to come from families, schools, the community and government to break down this inconsistency. Further to this, there are a number of economic, social and physical barriers to participation by women in sport and recreation. These may include limited money, inadequate child-care facilities, cost of access, lack of transport, remoteness and isolation, and religious and cultural constraints. One indirect constraint which I touched on previously is the lack of media coverage of women's sport. Nationally, less that 5% of total sports reporting in newspapers is devoted to womens sports. This scarcity of media coverage of women's participation and achievements in sport and recreation has resulted in there being a lack of role models for girls and women to follow. It also leads to women's sport receiving vastly lower levels of sponsorship and funding than its male counterparts. In the administration area, women are poorly represented in the decision-making and administrative structures for sport and recreation. In the Northern Territory last year, 26 women and 82 men held the position of president of a Northern Territory sporting or recreational body being funded by the Department of Sport and Recreation. One of the reasons for this is that is it often the case that many women do not have the confidence and/or skills either to participate in or to promote their sport or recreation. The department has identified a need for gender-specific training and in-servicing to combat this situation. I should add that, when learning new sport and recreation skills, it is often beneficial for people to learn them in a gender-specific environment. This leads me to the mission statement of the draft policy. It is: To promote and facilitate the participation of women and girls in sport and recreation throughout the Northern Territory. It is self-explanatory, and it gives the department a focus to work on in the future. The aims in this regard are as follows: to establish a framework within which to address the issues; to make clear policy statements based on the issues; and to encourage Northern Territory sporting and recreational organisations to adopt gender equity into their strategic plans. Further to these aims, this policy will address the needs of: women and girls involved currently in sport and recreation; and women and girls wishing to gain greater access to sport and recreation facilities. Girls and women from 5 years onwards are considered in this policy but, within certain programs, specific age groups will be targeted and promoted - for example in the Active Girls Program which caters at present for females within the 12 to 20 age group. The Department of Sport and Recreation acknowledges the National Policy and Plan for Women in Sport and the Australian Women in Sport and Recreation 10 170


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