Territory Stories

Debates Day 1 - Tuesday 23 November 1999

Details:

Title

Debates Day 1 - Tuesday 23 November 1999

Other title

Parliamentary Record 20

Collection

Debates for 8th Assembly 1997 - 2001; ParliamentNT; Parliamentary Record; 8th Assembly 1997 - 2001

Date

1999-11-23

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Language

English

Subject

Debates

Publisher name

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/279007

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/419429

Page content

DEBATES - Tuesday 23 November 1999 I urge the government to follow up the research that has been done in recent years into ways in which we can significantly overcome these problems, and give very serious consideration to the enhancement of the power supplies through the undergrounding and upgrading of power supplies, particularly through the older sections of Darwin. I urge the Chief Minister and the government to look seriously at this. It is not just a cute point. It is critically important to industries which work in micro-seconds of time, and where the ability and reliability of supply creates the market in a particular location, that these services are maintained and developed to the stage where you can go out with confidence into the world market and state that you have that infrastructure in place, you have the skills within your community, you have the resources within your community, and you have all the necessary foundations to build an important industry in a key location in the South- East Asian region. Motion agreed to. LEGAL AID AMENDMENT BILL (Serial 176) Continued from 21 October 1999. Mr STIRLING (Nhulunbuy): Mr Speaker, this is a straightforward amendment bill that makes 3 quite simple changes to the Legal Aid Act. The Commonwealth no longer wants 2 commissioners on the boards of state and territory legal aid commissions. That will reduce the number of commissioners to 7. Of course that means that the constitution and the quorum requirements both need to be amended to reflect that reduction. The other amendment picks up the Legal Aid Commissions request to allow a staff member from regional offices to attend in place of the commissioner with the commissioners consent. I have spoken with the Northern Territory Legal Aid Commission on this amendment bill. They have absolutely no concerns with it. The opposition supports the amendments. Mr BURKE (Attorney-General): Mr Speaker, I thank the opposition for their support. As the shadow attorney-general said, this is a straightforward and practical amendment. I move that the bill be now read a second time. Motion agreed to; bill read a second time. Mr BURKE (Attorney-General) (by leave): Mr Speaker, I move that the bill be now read a third time. Motion agreed to; bill read a third time. SALE OF GOODS AMENDMENT BILL (Serial 1S2) Continued from 14 October 1999. Mr STIRLING (Nhulunbuy): Mr Speaker, this is an interesting amendment which repeals section 9 of the Sale o f Goods Act. Section 9, under the heading Contract of Sale for 50 Dollars and Upwards, or Part I reads: A contract for the sale o f any goods o f the value o f $50 or upwards shall not be enforceable by action unless the buyer shall accept part o f the goods so sold and actually receive the same, or give something in earnest to bind the contract, or in part payment, or unless some note or memorandum in writing o f the contract be made and signed by the party to be charged or his agent on that behalf. Apart from the quaint language used in this section, it can be used to quite malicious effect. In fact it was used by a customer against a local business to get out of accepting and paying for goods on the basis that the order had been placed by phone and not in writing as per section 9. So the amendments are a result of this matter being pursued by the small business through the Small Claims Court and thereby coming to the attention of the Attorney-General. Clearly the section requires repeal to avoid any repetition of the unscrupulous type of behaviour undertaken by the customer, in this instance relying on section 9 of the act. I note in the Attomey- Generals second reading that other jurisdictions have over years past repealed that section of their acts and we, of course, support the bill. Mr BURKE (Attorney-General): Mr Speaker, I thank the opposition for their comments and move that the bill be now read a second time. Motion agreed to; bill read a second time. Mr BURKE (Attorney-General) (by leave): Mr Speaker, I move that the bill be now read a third time. Motion agreed to; bill read a third time. PLANNING BILL 1999 (Serial 198) PLANNING (CONSEQUENTIAL AMENDMENTS) BILL 1999 (Serial 199)