Territory Stories

Debates Day 5 - Wednesday 28 February 2001

Details:

Title

Debates Day 5 - Wednesday 28 February 2001

Other title

Parliamentary Record 27

Collection

Debates for 8th Assembly 1997 - 2001; ParliamentNT; Parliamentary Record; 8th Assembly 1997 - 2001

Date

2001-02-28

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Language

English

Subject

Debates

Publisher name

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/278982

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/419455

Page content

DEBATES - Wednesday 28 February 2001 Mr HATTON: That is true, but not like Bob Collins or Marshall Perron or Steve Hatton. Mr Stirling: You havent retired yet. Mr HATTON: No, but I am going to at next election, I can tell you now. I am not retiring from the Territory, either. I am just retiring from this Assembly. If you want to speak with a depth of commitment to the Northern Territory, demonstrate that commitment to the Northern Territory by putting your money where your mouth is; put your commitment into action rather than words. That is my response to the member for Barkly. I believe in the Northern Territory. There is still much to do for people who are retiring and our aged population. We should never assume that we have solved all the problems. There will always be emerging needs and emerging aspirations, and we should seek to achieve those. It is so easy to guess the next one and make this the crisis of the day. But look at it in the context of the great advances that have been made, and are continuing to be made today, to advance the cause of Territorians. Dont try and scare aged Territorians with nonsensical and misleading headlines and articles. Rather, get out there and do something useful to help the aged population and the rest of the population in the Northern Territory. I do not respect in any way the comments of the members opposite, because all they are trying to do is create fear and discomfort in aged Territorians. Much is being achieved. Much needs yet to be achieved - and I make no bones about it. I am not denying that. But let us work at that objective rather than the objective of just saying: I might be able to pick up a few votes if I can make you feel that somehow youve had a really bad deal. That is not the way to encourage people to have a happy and comfortable life. Rather, it is to find practical solutions to meet their needs and aspirations. Mrs BRAHAM (Braitling): Mr Deputy Speaker, it has been interesting to listen to the debate today. Everyone has such a close relationship with the seniors within our community. They are wonderful people with whom I enjoy working. They have that lovely life experience behind them. They are always so free with their advice, and they are at the stage where they will speak their minds. They are a very important part of our community. When we first came to Ahce, it was rare to find anyone who retired to the Territory. In the 1970s, my mother-in-law, Grandma Braham, came to live with us, and she lived with us for 17 years. She was a tremendous experience for my children and the children of the neighbourhood who had never really known a grandmother because most of them were down south. Seniors, to me, are such an important part of our community. I think we have really done a lot for them. The minister mentioned that he is a grandfather. I just say to him that I was a grandmother at 45 years of age, and I am also now eligible for a Seniors Card, so perhaps he might organise that for me. Talking about the Seniors Card, I know they are meant to be recognised in other states (and this sounds small) but the Adelaide railway station does not acknowledge the Northern Territory Seniors Card. Obviously, we get many seniors who catch the Ghan to Alice, and they ask: Why isnt it recognised there? So perhaps the minister might like to ask that question. It is something you can bring about, because it is meant to be recognisable elsewhere. The pensioner scheme acknowledges very clearly our seniors. It is the best deal in Australia; there is no doubt about it. The fact they can travel every two years to family is of great benefit to our pensioners. We have the Senior Citizens Association in Alice Springs. Syd Howard is the president, and you can understand why they have such a great feeling of community. It is like a drop-in centre. They organise so many things. There is a bus supplied by the Council of the Ageing that collects people. It is well supported by community and service clubs within the town. People see the Senior Citizens Association as somewhere - okay, you are retired - you can go to contribute to life. Mr Dunham: Have they got comfy chairs? Mrs BRAHAM: They have their chairs, and that was my next point, minister. I was going to say to you that the Small Grants program was one of the best things you ever introduced. Tennant Creek received a grant, as did the Alice Springs Senior Citizens Association. If you are looking for a good election initiative, I would suggest that in the budget moneys are allocated to that Small Grants program for seniors because how do they raise money otherwise - a chook raffle or a lawn sale? It is very, very hard for seniors at that stage of life to actually get out and raise a lot of money. The grants offered by government were very good indeed. Our other residence for seniors in Alice Springs is the Old Timers home, run by Frontier Service. It has been there a long time, and it provides probably one of the best aged care facilities in the Territory. It is well respected, and the staff were recently 7521


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

We use temporary cookies on this site to provide functionality.
By continuing to use this site without changing your settings, you consent to our use of cookies.