Territory Stories

Debates Day 5 - Wednesday 17 October 2007

Details:

Title

Debates Day 5 - Wednesday 17 October 2007

Other title

Parliamentary Record 17

Collection

Debates for 10th Assembly 2005 - 2008; 10th Assembly 2005 - 2008; Parliamentary Record; ParliamentNT

Date

2007-10-17

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Language

English

Subject

Debates

Publisher name

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/278153

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/423053

Page content

DEBATES Wednesday 17 October 2007 4887 AEC report is not just a smokescreen for Tourism NT to try to implement something that I know has been underlying for some time. Ms SACILOTTO (Port Darwin): Mr Acting Deputy Speaker, this evening I wish to speak on a recent bereavement that has impacted on me and my constituents of Port Darwin and others in the wider Territory community. I express deep regret at the sudden and unexpected passing of Mrs Monica Sharp, and feel that it is appropriate that I share a little of Monicas life to be included in the Parliamentary Record forever, as Monica is included our hearts. I acknowledge in the gallery the presence of Monicas loving husband, Mr Eric Sharp, and Monicas dear friend, Mr Cyril Young. Monica Sharp, or Mon as she was known, was born on 28 September 1946 and passed away unexpectedly in Darwin on 14 September this year. Monica lived with her husband, Eric, at their home in Nakara. She was a true Territory woman - adventurous, full of life with a spirit that cared for others. Monica was born to Raymond and Hilda Cadney in Gevelinghausen, Germany. She was the eldest of two children born to the Cadney family, and her brother Roger was seven years younger. Monicas family resided in Germany for a time, as her father was in the British Army. Unfortunately, when they returned to England, life was difficult as there was an abundance of anti-war sentiment against German associations. Monica later returned to Germany to work as a secretary in a steelworks company. In January 1969, Monica met Eric Sharp, who was to be her husband and the love of her life. Eric was also in the British Army and love blossomed between them, even though there were other soldiers competing for pretty Monicas attentions. On New Years Eve in 1969, Monica and Eric wed and began their married life in Monicas one-bedroom flat, with a single bed, until they were issued with married quarters nearly two years later. I am told their married life was adventurous, as Eric was posted to numerous operational areas, and they set up home in Northern Ireland, Hong Kong and back in Germany many times. It was while living in England at Catterick Camp Military Base in 1971 that they became parents for the first time, to Samantha. In 1974, Caroline was born in Bristol. Monica really loved the familys time in Hong Kong and taught English to Chinese Nationals. The family wanted to migrate to Australia and, when Eric retired from the Army in January 1987, he flew to Sydney with the Russian airline Aeroflot. I am told that Monica was always looking for a bargain and Aeroflot was certainly that. In November 1987, Monica and their daughters arrived to be reunited with Eric who had found work and a home for his family. Apparently, there is a standing joke in the Sharp family in that Monica, the bargain hunter, the girls and the family dog, Patsy, flew United Airlines which made Patsys airfare more expensive than Erics. Monica soon found employment and was a clerk for Pacific Dunlop in the Battery Division, and later with Templar Marketing. Monica was a wonderful mother, wife and travelling companion to Eric. She loved her daughters to bits and there were always words of love and encouragement, but she could also get their attention when it was required. In 2000, Eric and Monica became a couple of grey nomads and set about travelling Australia. However, after only four months, mainly in the Centre, they arrived in Darwin, decided to stay for a while and got jobs. Monica worked at Cullen Bay Serviced Apartments. Two years later, they resumed their travels, taking in the west coast, south coast, Tasmania and, later, Sydney. About this time, they received a call from a friend wanting to know if they wanted to work in Armata, which is about 150 km from Ayers Rock. Eric and Monica took up the challenge and spent six months managing the local community store. They also worked at Hermannsburg before returning to Darwin. Settling back into life in Darwin, Monica joined the Australian Red Cross as a care worker in a position she held until she unexpectedly passed away. Monica was a very community-minded person and, during her life, she was a member of the New South Wales Bushfires Brigade, a volunteer for the Arafura Games and a very active committee member for the National Seniors and the Land Cruiser Club. Monica had an effervescence and enthusiasm for life and all it offered to her. She loved the bush and enjoyed nothing better than to be with Eric and their friends sitting around a camp fire enjoying a glass or two. As I said, Monica was a true Territory woman who had found her niche in the Territory. She loved the Territory way of life and was fascinated by Aboriginal culture, their ability to live off the land, bush medicine and bush tucker. She also loved history in general and loved to go to the movies with Eric, especially to see true stories. It is well known to her friends and family that Monica loved a bargain, and her favourite colour was blue. She was an avid Queensland supporter in the State of Origin and had a standing bet with


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