Territory Stories

Debates Day 1 - Tuesday 10 October 2006

Details:

Title

Debates Day 1 - Tuesday 10 October 2006

Other title

Parliamentary Record 10

Collection

Debates for 10th Assembly 2005 - 2008; 10th Assembly 2005 - 2008; Parliamentary Record; ParliamentNT

Date

2006-10-10

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Language

English

Subject

Debates

Publisher name

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/278101

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/423115

Page content

DEBATES Tuesday 10 October 2006 3131 I know my grandparents and uncles who have passed away would be very proud of my achievements and I pay my respects to them for inspiring me to follow in the Hampton family tradition of serving the community. That is why I am placing their names on the public record. Throughout my personal and political development, there have been two very influential traditions that have provided me with strong values and principles. It is most fitting that the strong traditions of the Labor Party and my indigenous background and culture have come together today as one. I am proud to have been initiated into my mothers culture and place on the public record my respect and thanks to my mothers family and elders through the Tanami and Anmatjere regions for keeping the stories, the songs, and the dances strong, many times against all odds. I feel it is appropriate for me to apologise to the Stolen Generation as a member of the Northern Territory parliament. I do so by saying that I feel the pain and hurt inflicted onto those people directly affected by this policy. I have seen the heartache that many children have experienced who have a parent, or parents, who were taken away. I am proud to be a member of this government because this government has acknowledged this mistake and the impact that it has had on so many lives. To the Northern Territory Labor Party, of which I am a proud member, I say thank you for giving me the opportunity and for your support over the by-election. Particular thanks to George Addison, the Northern Territory Branch Secretary; Warren Snowdon, the Northern Territory Branch President; Senator Trish Crossin, and all those people from within the party and community members who helped during the campaign. I am proud to say that the seat of Stuart, which has been held by the Labor Party for the past 23 years will surpass a quarter of century of Labor traditions and values in the next couple of years. I have been fortunate enough to have known each previous member for Stuart including Roger Vale, former Opposition Leader, Brian Ede and Peter Toyne. To Peter Toyne and Thea, his wife, I say thank you for all that you have taught me and passed on to me over many years. Peter has been a great mentor and mate of mine. I have no hesitation in saying that although his shoes cannot be filled, his footsteps will be followed. I have many fond memories of Peter and great stories. Obviously, my favourite memory is his bush driving skills, or more particularly that his enthusiasm was not necessarily matched by his ability. Peter was fondly known as the Minister for the Finke Desert Race. Just let me say he is a better navigator than driver. I am sure every member in this House has much respect for Peter and the unbelievable workload he undertook throughout his years in parliament. His hard work ethic and fairness is something that I believe I developed whilst working with him over many years. I would also like to thank my uncle Robin Japanangka Granites for his help during the election. His cultural knowledge and respect amongst the people of Stuart was invaluable to me and he has been a fantastic cultural mentor for me over this time. To my sister, Pauline, I thank her for everything she has done for me throughout my life. She has been more like a mother to me than a sister and I know that she has sacrificed a lot during her life for me. To my younger brother, Vaughn, although there is a six-year age gap between us, I have watched him pave his own way in life and I am proud of him and his commitment to his children, Thomas, Kyle and Lyarni, and his wife, Yvette. I am also extremely proud to have my niece, Shakira, and nephews, Anthony and Nathan here today. There are two special ladies I would like to mention who are not here with me today to share this special occasion. The first lady is my mother, Florrie Singleton, who passed away in 1985 when I was 14 years old. My mother is someone I miss very much. I know that she would be very proud of my achievements. The second lady is my sister, Donna, who passed away in 1990. She was only 23 years old and her life was cut tragically short. I will always remember the good times we had growing up and especially having to put up with her music and fascination with bands like Duran Duran. I miss her dearly. To my father Robert, I say thank you for providing me with the opportunities throughout my life. My father is here today and I would like to say that he takes a lot of credit for me achieving what I have. I would like to make special mention of my wife, Rebecca, and our three sons, Joshua, Curtly and Jamie, all of whom are here today. Over the past month during the election, my family has sacrificed a lot for me to achieve what I have. Today is as much for them as it is for me. Campaigning in a bush seat is very demanding, both physically and mentally, because of its size and the complexity of the issues. During this time, Rebecca has been a rock at home and I thank her for her support, advice and reality checks.


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