Territory Stories

Devil's advocate

Details:

Title

Devil's advocate

Other title

The quarterly magazine from the Arid Lands Environment Centre

Creator

Arid Lands Environment Centre

Collection

Devil's advocate; E-Journals; PublicationNT; Devil's advocate

Date

2015-03-01

Location

Alice Springs

Notes

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.; Healthy futures for arid lands and people

Language

English

Subject

Environmental Protection; Australia, Central; Conservation Of Natural Resources; Arid Lands Environment Centre (Australia); Periodicals

Publisher name

Arid Lands Environment Centre

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Series

Devil's advocate

Volume

Autumn 2015

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

Arid Lands Environment Centre

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00042

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/274639

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/425074

Page content

Food for Alice Join the Food for Alice Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/ groups/108715702520033/ Food for Alice is an ALEC run local food distribution project aiming to increase local-grown produce and food resilience. I have been managing Food for Alice now for over 6 months and it has quickly become one of the most engaging and exciting projects I have done at ALEC. I love the fact that we are giving local gardens an avenue to sell their excess produce that would have normally gone to compost. I love that most of our producers are now actively growing more without the constraint of only producing what their family and friends would have eaten. I love that we are able to pay for this produce giving local gardeners and growers rewards for their efforts and something to go towards the cost of producing this yummy fresh food. I love the conversations I have at the market with customers about all sorts of things, from how what we are doing supports the local community, to just their joy at getting fresh local food. I especially love the education side, the fact that yes carrots can and do look like that, or yes a pumpkin can be sun bleached on the outside, and very yummy on the inside. That this is what spinach really looks like when it is grown with love and care, and yes it really does last up to a week and half in the fridge with no need of pesticide or preservatives. The conversations with some first time customers who come looking for produce to only find out that it is out of season so it is not available right now. This one always reminds me of just how much, and how easily it is for people to become disconnected with food supplies and the fact that in order to have fruit and vegetables all year round, the supermarkets have to source them from all over the world. Like the table grapes that come from California, or mushrooms that come from Mexico. In fact some of these fruit and vegetables have travelled more than some people travel in their whole life. So Food for Alice to me is more than just a local farmers market where people can purchase local fresh fruit and vegetables. Its a conversation started for environmental impact, its a classroom and teaching space, it a social outing, its a community space for people to get together and support each other. It is also direct proof that there is a market out there for locally grown produce. This is probably one of the most exciting aspects for me. Food for Alice was expanded with the help of a Community Climate Change Grant from the NT government. The grant money ran out quite a while ago, and since then Food for Alice has made its own way with the support of volunteers and the surplus it makes from selling the produce. We are getting closer to the goal of turning this small social enterprise into its own sustainable small business that can actually pay for itself. And that is a very exciting thing. Carmel Vandermolen Food for Alice is always looking for new growers, excess produce and volunteers. Please contact Carmel on 89522497 business@alec.org.au Local producer, Rodney from the Happy Farmer NT stocks the stall with home grown goodness


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

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