Territory Stories

Annual Report 2011/2012 Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency

Details:

Title

Annual Report 2011/2012 Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency

Other title

Tabled paper 181

Collection

Tabled papers for 12th Assembly 2012 - 2016; Tabled papers; ParliamentNT

Date

2012-12-06

Description

Deemed

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory under Standing Order 240. Where copyright subsists with a third party it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material.

Language

English

Subject

Tabled papers

Publisher name

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

See publication

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C01689

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/273083

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/427345

Page content

AHPRA ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 AHPRA ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 72 REGISTRATIONS The annual nursing and midwifery renewal cycle was completed in the last quarter of 2011/12. Online renewals increased by approximately 10% compared to last years renewal cycle. AHPRA distributed more than one million emails to nurses and midwives reminding them to renew their registration, and decreased the distribution of hard copy renewal applications by 12%. Criminal record checks Under the National Law, applicants for initial registration must undergo a criminal record check. National Boards may also require criminal record checks at other times. Applicants seeking registration must disclose any criminal history information when they apply for registration, and practitioners renewing their registration are required to disclose if there has been a change to their criminal history status within the preceding 12 months. While a failure to disclose a criminal history by a registered health practitioner does not constitute an offence under the National Law, such a failure may constitute behaviour for which a National Board may take health, conduct or performance action. The criminal record check is undertaken by an independent agency which provides a criminal history report. AHPRA may also seek a report from a police commissioner or an entity in a jurisdiction outside Australia that has access to records about the criminal history of people in that jurisdiction. The criminal history reports are used as one part of assessing an applicants suitability to hold registration. Results of criminal history checks In 2011/12, AHPRA requested 68,627 criminal record checks of practitioners 16,182 more than last year. Reasons for this increase include assessing more than 16,000 applications for registration from practitioners in the four professions due to join the scheme in July 2012; all of which required criminal record checks. Of the 68,627 criminal record checks conducted, 4,067 (6%) of results indicated that the applicant had a criminal history. This is comparable to 2010/11, as recorded in Table 1: National comparison of criminal history checks 2010/11 and 2011/12. Of the 4,067 results with a criminal history, 404 were assessed as having the potential to affect registration. After consideration by the relevant National Board, nine of the 404 assessed as having the potential to affect registration led to action on the applications as follows: three applications refused: two medical; one nursing and midwifery six had conditions imposed or undertakings accepted on registration: three nursing and midwifery; two medical; one dental. Table 1: National comparison of criminal history checks 2010/11 and 2011/12 Financial year Number of criminal history checks conducted Number of disclosable court outcomes (DCOs) % of DCOs resulting from criminal record checks submitted 2010/11 52,445 2,992 6% 2011/12 68,627 4,067 6% The National Law (sections 79 and 135) requires all criminal history to be released, regardless of where or when it originated. However, this is still affected by the definition in each relevant state or territory of what constitutes criminal history. The 4,067 results indicating the applicant had a criminal history were released to AHPRA as disclosable court outcomes (DCOs). While the exact definition of a releasable criminal history and the nature of DCOs released varies between policing and law enforcement bodies in each state and territory (for example some but not all jurisdictions include traffic offences in their definition of criminal history), definitions and release of DCOs is largely consistent in the more serious offence categories. More detail on DCOs arising from criminal history checks by each state and territory is recorded in Table 2: Disclosable court outcomes by jurisdiction. Table 2: Disclosable court outcomes by jurisdiction State/ territory Number of criminal history checks conducted Number of DCOs % of DCOs resulting from criminal record checks submitted NT 481 38 8% ACT 812 46 6% TAS 1,352 193 14% SA 4,659 443 10% WA 5,904 586 10% QLD 10,534 732 7% VIC 21,134 549 3% NSW 23,751 1,480 6% Total 68,627 4,067 6% If a certain offence does not fall within the jurisdictions definition of criminal history, it will not be released. For example, Tasmanian police include traffic offences in their definition of criminal history and will release offences such as speeding and seatbelt use. Queensland police, on the other hand, do not include traffic offences in their definition of criminal history and will not release information on these offences in response to AHPRAs requests for criminal history checks. AHPRA is considering options to manage this variation in criminal history definitions and information release across jurisdictions.


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