Territory Stories

Debates Day 4 - Tuesday 9 May 2017

Details:

Title

Debates Day 4 - Tuesday 9 May 2017

Other title

Parliamentary Record 5

Collection

Debates for 13th Assembly 2016 - 2018; ParliamentNT; Parliamentary Record; 13th Assembly 2016 - 2020

Date

2017-05-09

Description

pp 1623 to 1686

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Language

English

Subject

Debates

Publisher name

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/271438

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/432640

Page content

DEBATES Tuesday 9 May 2017 1627 Criminal Records (Spent Convictions) Act Criminal Records (Spent Convictions) Regulations Firearms Act Australian Crime Commission (Northern Territory) Act Interpretation Act Jurisdiction of Courts (Cross-Vesting) Act Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Northern Territory) Act Competition Policy Reform (Northern Territory) Act Police Administration Act. The bill also amends section 11 of the Australian Crime Commission (Northern Territory) Act so the quorum for the Australian Crime Commission Board is nine members rather than seven. This reflects section 7F of the Australian Crime Commission Act 2002. The new section 172 of the Police Administration Act provides that under section 147A, relating to DNA information between CrimTrac and the minister or the commissioner, as in force immediately before 1 July 2016, is deemed from that date to have been in agreement with the Australian Crime Commission. I note that the amendments to the Interpretation Act include definitions of the Australian Crime Commission, the Federal Circuit Court and the Federal Court. Amendments are therefore also made to the Jurisdiction of Courts (Cross-Vesting) Act and the Competition Police Reform (Northern Territory) Act along with the Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Northern Territory) Act to take into account the new definition of Federal Court. At the November 2015 meeting of the Law, Crime and Community Safety Council it was agreed that the necessary legislative and administrative steps would be taken within each jurisdiction to put into effect the proposed merger of CrimTrac and the Australian Crime Commission. Ministers at that meeting also agreed to a new intergovernmental agreement. Whilst talking about the previous functions of CrimTrac and the Australian Crime Commission, I will recap for the House. CrimTrac and the Australian Crime Commission are two of Australias national law enforcement bodies, created to provide police with access to national policing information and intelligence. CrimTrac was Australias policing information-sharing agency. Its operations and governance structures were underpinned by an intergovernmental agreement between the Commonwealth, states and territories. The Australian Crime Commission is Australias national criminal intelligence agency. It was established by the Australian Crime Commission Act 2002, which was Commonwealth legislation, and then by various state and territory acts such as the Australian Crime Commission (Northern Territory) Act. The basis of the merger agreed to at that meeting by all states and territories was that the limited interoperability and information sharing between CrimTrac and the Australian Crime Commission affected their ability to support police and other key stakeholders to manage crime-related tasks. Each agency recognised that they had vulnerabilities in the areas that were strengths of the other agency. For example, the Australian Crime Commission had a sophisticated analytical capability for providing intelligence, but prior to the merger had full connectivity to only 20% of the national criminal information data holdings. Conversely, CrimTrac informed 90% of the everyday, on-the-ground police operations, but its ICT blueprint for national police information sharing 201418 recognised the need for analytic capability across its data to better support policing. As we have outlined, the merger took place on 1 July 2016. The former functions of the Australian Crime Commission following the commencement of the Australian Crime Commission (National Policing Information Charges) Act 2016 and the older intergovernmental agency agreement was terminated.


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