Territory Stories

Debates Day 4 - Tuesday 30 October 2012

Details:

Title

Debates Day 4 - Tuesday 30 October 2012

Other title

Parliamentary Record 1

Collection

Debates for 12th Assembly 2012 - 2016; ParliamentNT; Parliamentary Record; 12th Assembly 2012 - 2016

Date

2012-10-30

Notes

Made available by the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

Language

English

Subject

Debates

Publisher name

Hansard Office

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

http://hdl.handle.net/10070/268378

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/438461

Page content

DEBATES Tuesday 30 October 2012 272 School is well known and has an enormous amount of students. I believe the numbers are over 1000. The Northern Territory Open Education Centre is a school itself. It provides education from Rapid Creek to all over the Territory. The Greek School is a traditional Greek school that students attend on Saturday mornings. It was wonderful to be there last Saturday to share in Oxi Day which is their independence day. That is a little about the schools in my electorate. I take this opportunity to thank all the staff and the teachers at those schools for their ongoing efforts throughout the year. I look forward to catching up with them over the coming few weeks as they head towards the end of school. Ms PURICK (Goyder): Mr Deputy Speaker, I will speak about two issues, one is a very happy issue and that is to compliment and commend one of my constituents, Joy Wood, who is part of the Australian team who is now in Miramar, Argentina, to compete for five days in the 2012 World Field Archery Championships of the International Field Archery Association. She will be there for approximately two weeks with the Australian team. Joy will be competing in the Veterans Womens Long Bow Division in which she currently holds the Australian record for all three of the IFAA competition rounds, and the pacific region record for two of the rounds. Joy is not only a participant in this sport, she is also a coach. Her coaching achievements include: for three years in a row - 2002, 2003 and 2004 - Joy was a finalist in the Coach of the Year Category of the NT Sports Awards and was nominated for coach and sportsperson categories on several other occasions. In 2003, she was one of the 43 recipients from over 1000 applicants to receive a Sports Leadership Grant for Rural and Remote Women from the Australian Sports Commission and the Office of the Status of Women to assist in completion of the Level 2 Field Archery Coaching Course. There are only seven other level 2 field archery coaches in Australia and five of them are in New South Wales. As the Northern Territory branch coach, she held courses to train 37 field archery coaches and nine instructors throughout the Northern Territory, 20 coaches in Queensland and five in Victoria, and has coached mainly beginner and more advanced archers at club level. All Field Archery Australia coaches, Joy included, are volunteers who do not receive payment. She received awards at Litchfield Council Australia Day presentations in two separate years for her efforts in promoting archery in the local rural community and elsewhere. Her sporting achievements are also exemplary. In 2004, Joy travelled to the World Field Archery Championships in Watkins Glen, USA, and was placed third in the adult womens long bow, which is a remarkable achievement from someone from the Northern Territory competing on the world stage. In 2005, she travelled to the regional championships in New Zealand breaking two pacific regional records for that division. In 2006, she broke both ankles four weeks before the WFAC was held in Hervey Bay, Queensland. She purchased a second-hand motorised wheelchair so she could still compete and she won the gold medal. In 2007, the Pacific Regional Championships were held in Sale, Victoria, where Joy broke the existing record in all three rounds and still holds two of the records. In 2010, sadly, Joy sustained a crush fracture of her L2 vertebrae in a car accident. It was a long time before she could compete again, so she elected to move into the veterans division, which is over 55 years of age, where consideration is given which reduces the amount of walking required. In 2011, at the Pacific Regional Championship, she set new records in the two rounds that were shot. With all these ailments and accidents she has incurred over the last short while, she has still gone on to compete, not only at a Territory and national level, but at an international level. I wish Joy, and her team mates, all the best in this championship and I am sure she will come back with trophies of the gold colour. The second thing I wanted to mention was in regard to the intersection of Freds Pass Road and the Arnhem Highway which has, in the last six months, been upgraded somewhat but is still less than satisfactory. The Student Representative Council of the Taminmin College Senior School has started to lobby local members and highlight what it believes to be serious safety issues at that intersection. I would like to read into Hansard its letter, and I trust the Minister for Transport and roads will look into this very serious issue as presented by the schools in that area. Dear member for Goyder We are writing to inform you of our concern about the dangers of the Freds Pass Road and Arnhem Highway intersection and the section of highway encompassing the post office and the United service station. On Wednesday afternoon and Thursday morning of the first week of term three there were two collisions in less than 24 hours at the intersection. Thankfully these collisions did not result in any fatalities but they were


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