Territory Stories

Overcoming indigenous disadvantage - key indicators

Details:

Title

Overcoming indigenous disadvantage - key indicators

Creator

Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT

Date

2003-11

Description

The OID report measures the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have been actively involved in the development and production of the report. Section 1.1 describes the origins of the report, and section 1.2 describes its key objectives. Section 1.3 provides contextual information on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Section 1.4 includes a brief historical narrative to help put the information in the report into context. Section 1.5 summarises some recent developments in government policy that have influenced the report and section 1.6 provides further information on the Steering Committee and the OID Working Group that advises it.

Notes

"These reports generally uses the term ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians’ to describe Australia’s first peoples and ‘non-Indigenous Australians’ to refer to Australians of other backgrounds, except where quoting other sources." Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this publication may contain images of deceased people.

Table of contents

Preliminaries -- Overview chapter -- Introduction -- The framework -- Key themes and interpretation -- COAG targets and headline indicators -- Governance, leadership and culture -- Early child development -- Education and training -- Healthy lives -- Economic participation -- Home environment -- Safe and supportive communities -- Outcomes for Torres Strait Islander people -- Measuring factors that improve outcomes -- Appendices.

Language

English

Subject

Aboriginal Australians -- Ecoomic conditions; Aboriginal Australians -- Social conditions; Public welfare administration -- Australia; Aboriginal Australians -- Services for; Closing the Gap of Indigenous Disadvantage (Australia)

Publisher name

Australia. Productivity Commission for the Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision

Place of publication

Canberra (A.C.T.)

Format

5 volumes (various pagings) : charts, colour map ; 30 cm.

File type

application/pdf

ISBN

9781740375917 (Print); 9781740375900 (PDF)

ISSN

1448-9805 (Print); 2206-9704 (Online)

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

Australia. Productivity Commission for the Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00042

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/267090

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/445158

Related items

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/445153; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/445154; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/445156; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/445151

Page content

7.10 OVERCOMING INDIGENOUS DISADVANTAGE 2016 the wider environment, including socio-economic circumstances, and parental and community involvement (Fredricks, Blumenfeld and Paris 2004; Helme and Lamb 2011; Munns, ORourke and Bodkin-Andrews 2013; Social Inclusion Board 2007). Research also shows engaging parents in their childrens education improves the childrens educational attainment and ongoing engagement in education (Higgins and Morley 2014). Schools have been found to have higher levels of student engagement when there was a strong disciplinary climate, good student-teacher relations and high expectations for student success (OECD 2003). School engagement and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students Relatively few studies have considered how the concept of school engagement relates to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. As part of its evaluation of the Sporting Chance Program, the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) completed a literature review of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander school engagement (Lonsdale et al. 2011). Four key components were identified: positive self-identity including feelings about ones self and culture belonging including both broad cultural connectedness, and group connectedness (with peers), which is closely linked to self-identity participation including choosing to be actively involved in learning tasks attendance including being present at school. However, merely being present did not mean that a student was engaged in school, and conversely, absenteeism did not mean that a student was not engaged (for example, cultural reasons for absences could mean a student is engaged in learning that is important to their self-identity and belonging). A recent study by Mooney et al (2016) in metropolitan Sydney found that a positive sense of culture was positively related to school engagement. De Bortoli and Thomson (2010) examined the influence of contextual factors on the results of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and non-Indigenous students in the 2000 and 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests.5 For both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous students, performance in maths and science was strongly associated with self-efficacy, and positively correlated with self-concept. On average, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students reported significantly lower levels of confidence in their abilities. 5 PISA is a triennial international survey which aims to evaluate education systems worldwide by testing the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students. In Australia, PISA is a key part of the National Assessment Program (NAP) and complements other NAP assessments, such as the National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN).


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

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