Territory Stories

Review of the Museum and Art Gallery services : a report to the Department of Community Development, Sport & Cultural Affairs

Details:

Title

Review of the Museum and Art Gallery services : a report to the Department of Community Development, Sport & Cultural Affairs

Other title

MAGNT Review December 2004 Morgan; Internal review of MAGNT. Final report March 2004

Creator

Morgan, Gary

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT

Date

2004-12

Description

"This Review has looked at the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory’s outputs relative to benchmark museum and art gallery activities and outputs around Australia and relative to international trends in museum practice. This Review has also considered possible service outcomes set against three funding scenarios." - Executive summary

Notes

This review was commissioned by Risk Management Services of the Department of the Chief Minister for the Northern Territory, on behalf of the Department of Community Development, Sport and Cultural Affairs. The review was put to Tender in October 2004, with the Tender awarded in November 2004. - Introduction; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Table of contents

Executive summary -- Part A: Introduction - Background -- Outputs of this review. Part B: Outputs of the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory - A comparison of the MAGNT outputs in activities of collection development and management, public programs and research relative to those of other state museums and galleries - A discussion of the MAGNT outputs relative to national and international trends in museums and galleries - A consideration of the scientific focus of the MAGNT in terms of a) its management and outcomes relative to other museums and b) its contribution to Northern Territory economic activity and Government programs - A comparison of per square metre exhibition costs at the MAGNT relative to other institutions - A comparison of the acquisition budget of the MAGNT relative to other institutions. Part C: Possible budget scenarios - A discussion of three budget scenarios for the MAGNT with their consequent service outcomes. Part D: Summary of recommendations. Part E: Sources and acknowledgements. Part F: Appendices 1-8

Language

English

Subject

Museums -- Northern Territory -- Public opinion; Museums -- Evaluation; Public relations -- Museums -- Northern Territory

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Darwin

Format

xviii, 124 pages ; 30 cm.

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Northern Territory Government

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/265558

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/457997

Related items

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/458000; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/457995

Page content

MAGNT Review December 2004 Morgan 7 PART B OUTPUTS OF THE MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY 3 A comparison of the MAGNT outputs in activities of collection development and management, public programs and research relative to those of other state museums and galleries 3.1 Overview The internal MAGNT Review of March 2004 provides a quite detailed summary of MAGNT outputs and facilities. It also has a number of comparisons of the MAGNT to several other Australian Museums, and some broader comparisons to average museum data. This Review does not attempt to repeat what has been provided in that internal March Review. This report refers to that document and to the Reviews by Stanton Partners (January 2004) and Mitchell (July 2004). Many types of organisation can be defined as a museum. This breadth of role is evident in the ICOM (the International Council of Museums) definition of a museum as: A museum is a non-profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, and open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment, material evidence of people and their environment (...) The peak membership body for museums in Australia, Museums Australia, has coined the definition (2002): A museum helps people understand the world by using objects and ideas to interpret the past and present and explore the future. A museum preserves and researches collections, and makes objects and information accessible in actual and virtual environments. Museums are established in the public interest as permanent, not-for-profit organisations that contribute long-term values to communities. Within these definitions, museums include art galleries and can include zoological gardens, botanical gardens, herbaria, aquaria and science centres. Museums as a generic type of organisation are diverse. It might be expected then that there will be significant differences in what different museums do. Even if the term museum is applied more restrictedly, say to institutions that are easily recognised as museums and art galleries, there is considerable diversity in the collections held and the disciplines pursued via research and public programs. This is as evident in Australia-New Zealand as it is overseas. Australia and New Zealand generally distinguish in title between museums (as collection and educational agencies of history, anthropology/ethnology, science, technology, natural history) and art galleries (as collection and educational agencies of visual arts, including fine and decorative arts). Nonetheless, there is considerable overlap in the collection coverage of agencies titled museums and those called art galleries and in the use of the terms