Territory Stories

The Northern Territory news Sat 26 Nov 2016

Details:

Title

The Northern Territory news Sat 26 Nov 2016

Other title

NT news

Collection

The Northern Territory news; NewspaperNT

Date

2016-11-26

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin

Publisher name

News Corp Australia

Place of publication

Darwin

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

News Corp Australia

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/265487

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/459106

Page content

CAREERS SATURDAY NOVEMBER 26 2016 CAREERS 0510 CLASSIFIEDS SATURDAY NOVEMBER 19 2016 COURIERMAIL.COM.AU Steve Earley (07) 3666 6415 steve.earley@news.com.au Business Development Manager (Recruiters/Corporate) Work with me to find your best candidate Australia-wide Hello, my name is Steve Earley. As an Account Manager specialising in corporate recruitment and recruitment agency advertising Im available to advise you on the most targeted active and passive candidate solutions across the News Corp print and digital network. My goal is help you to attract and place the best candidate and have access to an Australia wide talent pool. Contact me during business hours and Ill be happy to help you! PROSPECTS UNEARTHED FOR WOMEN IN MINING AN online mentoring program to help women succeed in the resources industry and encourage more gender diversity will run until at least mid-2018. The Federal Government will provide an extra $490,000 to ensure the Australian Women in Resources Alliances e-Mentoring Program survives. The program already has connected more than 200 women with experienced male and female mentors since funding started in 2013. Australian Mines and Metals Association industry services executive director Tara Diamond says it not only will help female workers but support the industry to be more competitive through workforce diversity. The resource industry is heavily male-dominated, with women comprising just 17 per cent of the national workforce compared to 46 per cent across all industries, Diamond says. Despite a challenging operating environment, the resource industry still employs almost 100,000 more people compared to 10 years ago, and opportunities abound for women to play a greater role in the industrys growing production capacity. As the only national program offering mentoring to women via an online platform, AWRA e-Mentoring is breaking down the barriers that in the past have prevented some women receiving valuable professional guidance, such as remote locations and non-traditional work schedules. The program will continue to be a critical part of the resource industrys multifaceted approach to support the career development of women across multiple occupations. This is particularly in technical and trade roles in which women have been traditionally underemployed. R E A D E R R E V I E W S JOB ads in construction are up 13 per cent this year compared to last year, driven by growth in mainland southern and eastern states. Queensland had a 19 per cent increase year-on-year. SEEKs Employment Trends Report finds at least a 30 per cent spike in the number of ads listed for plant and machinery operators, contracts managers and health, safety and environment workers, which were the top three growing sub-sectors. SEEK Australia and New Zealand managing director Michael Ilczynski says all sub-sectors of construction recorded growth except its smallest sector, quality assurance and control, which made up less than 1 per cent of all jobs anyway. Project managers, contract administrators, estimators, forepersons and site managers were in shortage, reflected in the SEEK data as the jobs with the greatest number of new ads. Ilczynski says the Rider Levett Bucknall Crane Index also proved construction was at record levels. The latest index has reported a record of 663 tower cranes across Australia for Quarter 3, 2016, with 90 per cent of cranes on eastern seaboard projects and 81 per cent of all cranes on new residential developments, he says. These Index statistics help support the growth trend weve seen in construction job ads on SEEK this October. Brisbanes strong housing market was fuelling work for estimators and other front-end construction workers as well as supervisors. Overall the number of job advertisements on SEEK across all industries was up 3.9 per cent compared to last October. THREE of the oldesttrades toolmaking,canvas and leathermak-ing, and jewellery mak-ing also have the oldestworkforces of any trade. Employment Department data shows the median age of canvas and leathergoods makers is 54, toolmakers and engineering patternmakers is 52, and jewellers is 51. Trades has a younger age profile than the total workforce, with just 34 per cent of workers aged 45 years and over, compared with 39 per cent for all occupations. While the canvas/leathermaker workforce is projected to remain stable in the next five years, growth is forecast for toolmakers (300 new jobs) and jewellers (200 new jobs), providing opportunities for younger people eager to break into the roles. As both trades have small workforces of about 5000 people employed each, it equals between 4 and 7 per cent growth. Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is among the new brigade of jewellers showing sparkle, winning the silver medal in the WorldSkills national competition last month. From a young age I loved jewellery, looking at it and making it, she says. When I was about 12 my mum and I went into Ruby Tuesday Jewellery, and it was then that I decided I wanted to be a jeweller. Through high school I chose subjects that allowed me to make jewellery and I had a very supportive teacher. She started a bachelor degree but when the course structure changed to no longer focus on jewellery, she found another path an apprenticeship at the same jeweller which inspired her career. She completed a Certificate III in Jewellery Manufacture qualification. OLD-SCHOOL COOL Cara Jenkin discovers there are jobs in making a living the old-fashioned way T R A D E S W H A T T H E Y R E S A Y I N G A B O U T . . . T H E W O R K Individual commission if you make your monthly budgets easy to make. Juggling multiple customers can be hard as you really need to focus on one person at a time, to avoid loss of stock. The team environment, inhouse training and staff benefits are fantastic. T H E S T A F F The people are amazing to work with, we bounce off each other. Great working environments with positive staff. Fantastic top managers and company owners. Best mentors and role models. C H A L L E N G E S Working Christmas. At first, learning about the jewellery. Sometimes difficult customers, however great management that helps in a situation. O V E R A L L R A T I N G 97 per cent of current and former employees would recommend working at Prouds Jewellers to a friend. 95 per cent of 39 reviewers rate salaries as high or average. The working environment was rated its best feature. VISIT SEEK.COM.AU TO READ MORE COMPANY REVIEWS VACANCIES C O N S T R U C T I O N L E A D S A D R I S E NEW BRIGADE: Jeweller Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is half the average age of others in the field. Picture: KYLIE ELSE Your destination for career advice blue collarwith 10 CLASSIFIEDS SATURDAY NOVEMBER 19 2016 COURIERMAIL.COM.AU Steve Earley (07) 3666 6415 steve.earley@news.com.au Business Development Manager (Recruiters/Corporate) Work with me to find your best candidate Australia-wide Hello, my name is Steve Earley. As an Account Manager specialising in corporate recruitment and recruitment agency advertising Im available to advise you on the most targeted active and passive candidate solutions across the News Corp print and digital network. My goal is help you to attract and place the best candidate and have access to an Australia wide talent pool. Contact me during business hours and Ill be happy to help you! PROSPECTS UNEARTHED FOR WOMEN IN MINING AN online mentoring program to help women succeed in the resources industry and encourage more gender diversity will run until at least mid-2018. The Federal Government will provide an extra $490,000 to ensure the Australian Women in Resources Alliances e-Mentoring Program survives. The program already has connected more than 200 women with experienced male and female mentors since funding started in 2013. Australian Mines and Metals Association industry services executive director Tara Diamond says it not only will help female workers but support the industry to be more competitive through workforce diversity. The resource industry is heavily male-dominated, with women comprising just 17 per cent of the national workforce compared to 46 per cent across all industries, Diamond says. Despite a challenging operating environment, the resource industry still employs almost 100,000 more people compared to 10 years ago, and opportunities abound for women to play a greater role in the industrys growing production capacity. As the only national program offering mentoring to women via an online platform, AWRA e-Mentoring is breaking down the barriers that in the past have prevented some women receiving valuable professional guidance, such as remote locations and non-traditional work schedules. The program will continue to be a critical part of the resource industrys multifaceted approach to support the career development of women across multiple occupations. This is particularly in technical and trade roles in which women have been traditionally underemployed. R E A D E R R E V I E W S JOB ads in construction are up 13 per cent this year compared to last year, driven by growth in mainland southern and eastern states. Queensland had a 19 per cent increase year-on-year. SEEKs Employment Trends Report finds at least a 30 per cent spike in the number of ads listed for plant and machinery operators, contracts managers and health, safety and environment workers, which were the top three growing sub-sectors. SEEK Australia and New Zealand managing director Michael Ilczynski says all sub-sectors of construction recorded growth except its smallest sector, quality assurance and control, which made up less than 1 per cent of all jobs anyway. Project managers, contract administrators, estimators, forepersons and site managers were in shortage, reflected in the SEEK data as the jobs with the greatest number of new ads. Ilczynski says the Rider Levett Bucknall Crane Index also proved construction was at record levels. The latest index has reported a record of 663 tower cranes across Australia for Quarter 3, 2016, with 90 per cent of cranes on eastern seaboard projects and 81 per cent of all cranes on new residential developments, he says. These Index statistics help support the growth trend weve seen in construction job ads on SEEK this October. Brisbanes strong housing market was fuelling work for estimators and other front-end construction workers as well as supervisors. Overall the number of job advertisements on SEEK across all industries was up 3.9 per cent compared to last October. THREE of the oldesttrades toolmaking,canvas and leathermak-ing, and jewellery mak-ing also have the oldestworkforces of any trade. Employment Department data shows the median age of canvas and leathergoods makers is 54, toolmakers and engineering patternmakers is 52, and jewellers is 51. Trades has a younger age profile than the total workforce, with just 34 per cent of workers aged 45 years and over, compared with 39 per cent for all occupations. While the canvas/leathermaker workforce is projected to remain stable in the next five years, growth is forecast for toolmakers (300 new jobs) and jewellers (200 new jobs), providing opportunities for younger people eager to break into the roles. As both trades have small workforces of about 5000 people employed each, it equals between 4 and 7 per cent growth. Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is among the new brigade of jewellers showing sparkle, winning the silver medal in the WorldSkills national competition last month. From a young age I loved jewellery, looking at it and making it, she says. When I was about 12 my mum and I went into Ruby Tuesday Jewellery, and it was then that I decided I wanted to be a jeweller. Through high school I chose subjects that allowed me to make jewellery and I had a very supportive teacher. She started a bachelor degree but when the course structure changed to no longer focus on jewellery, she found another path an apprenticeship at the same jeweller which inspired her career. She completed a Certificate III in Jewellery Manufacture qualification. OLD-SCHOOL COOL Cara Jenkin discovers there are jobs in making a living the old-fashioned way T R A D E S W H A T T H E Y R E S A Y I N G A B O U T . . . T H E W O R K Individual commission if you make your monthly budgets easy to make. Juggling multiple customers can be hard as you really need to focus on one person at a time, to avoid loss of stock. The team environment, inhouse training and staff benefits are fantastic. T H E S T A F F The people are amazing to work with, we bounce off each other. Great working environments with positive staff. Fantastic top managers and company owners. Best mentors and role models. C H A L L E N G E S Working Christmas. At first, learning about the jewellery. Sometimes difficult customers, however great management that helps in a situation. O V E R A L L R A T I N G 97 per cent of current and former employees would recommend working at Prouds Jewellers to a friend. 95 per cent of 39 reviewers rate salaries as high or average. The working environment was rated its best feature. VISIT SEEK.COM.AU TO READ MORE COMPANY REVIEWS VACANCIES C O N S T R U C T I O N L E A D S A D R I S E NEW BRIGADE: Jeweller Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is half the average age of others in the field. Picture: KYLIE ELSE Your destination for career advice blue collarwith 10 CLASSIFIEDS SATURDAY NOVEMBER 19 2016 COURIERMAIL.COM.AU Steve Earley (07) 3666 6415 steve.earley@news.com.au Business Development Manager (Recruiters/Corporate) Work with me to find your best candidate Australia-wide Hello, my name is Steve Earley. As an Account Manager specialising in corporate recruitment and recruitment agency advertising Im available to advise you on the most targeted active and passive candidate solutions across the News Corp print and digital network. My goal is help you to attract and place the best candidate and have access to an Australia wide talent pool. Contact me during business hours and Ill be happy to help you! PROSPECTS UNEARTHED FOR WOMEN IN MINING AN online mentoring program to help women succeed in the resources industry and encourage more gender diversity will run until at least mid-2018. The Federal Government will provide an extra $490,000 to ensure the Australian Women in Resources Alliances e-Mentoring Program survives. The program already has connected more than 200 women with experienced male and female mentors since funding started in 2013. Australian Mines and Metals Association industry services executive director Tara Diamond says it not only will help female workers but support the industry to be more competitive through workforce diversity. The resource industry is heavily male-dominated, with women comprising just 17 per cent of the national workforce compared to 46 per cent across all industries, Diamond says. Despite a challenging operating environment, the resource industry still employs almost 100,000 more people compared to 10 years ago, and opportunities abound for women to play a greater role in the industrys growing production capacity. As the only national program offering mentoring to women via an online platform, AWRA e-Mentoring is breaking down the barriers that in the past have prevented some women receiving valuable professional guidance, such as remote locations and non-traditional work schedules. The program will continue to be a critical part of the resource industrys multifaceted approach to support the career development of women across multiple occupations. This is particularly in technical and trade roles in which women have been traditionally underemployed. R E A D E R R E V I E W S JOB ads in construction are up 13 per cent this year compared to last year, driven by growth in mainland southern and eastern states. Queensland had a 19 per cent increase year-on-year. SEEKs Employment Trends Report finds at least a 30 per cent spike in the number of ads listed for plant and machinery operators, contracts managers and health, safety and environment workers, which were the top three growing sub-sectors. SEEK Australia and New Zealand managing director Michael Ilczynski says all sub-sectors of construction recorded growth except its smallest sector, quality assurance and control, which made up less than 1 per cent of all jobs anyway. Project managers, contract administrators, estimators, forepersons and site managers were in shortage, reflected in the SEEK data as the jobs with the greatest number of new ads. Ilczynski says the Rider Levett Bucknall Crane Index also proved construction was at record levels. The latest index has reported a record of 663 tower cranes across Australia for Quarter 3, 2016, with 90 per cent of cranes on eastern seaboard projects and 81 per cent of all cranes on new residential developments, he says. These Index statistics help support the growth trend weve seen in construction job ads on SEEK this October. Brisbanes strong housing market was fuelling work for estimators and other front-end construction workers as well as supervisors. Overall the number of job advertisements on SEEK across all industries was up 3.9 per cent compared to last October. THREE of the oldesttrades toolmaking,canvas and leathermak-ing, and jewellery mak-ing also have the oldestworkforces of any trade. Employment Department data shows the median age of canvas and leathergoods makers is 54, toolmakers and engineering patternmakers is 52, and jewellers is 51. Trades has a younger age profile than the total workforce, with just 34 per cent of workers aged 45 years and over, compared with 39 per cent for all occupations. While the canvas/leathermaker workforce is projected to remain stable in the next five years, growth is forecast for toolmakers (300 new jobs) and jewellers (200 new jobs), providing opportunities for younger people eager to break into the roles. As both trades have small workforces of about 5000 people employed each, it equals between 4 and 7 per cent growth. Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is among the new brigade of jewellers showing sparkle, winning the silver medal in the WorldSkills national competition last month. From a young age I loved jewellery, looking at it and making it, she says. When I was about 12 my mum and I went into Ruby Tuesday Jewellery, and it was then that I decided I wanted to be a jeweller. Through high school I chose subjects that allowed me to make jewellery and I had a very supportive teacher. She started a bachelor degree but when the course structure changed to no longer focus on jewellery, she found another path an apprenticeship at the same jeweller which inspired her career. She completed a Certificate III in Jewellery Manufacture qualification. OLD-SCHOOL COOL Cara Jenkin discovers there are jobs in making a living the old-fashioned way T R A D E S W H A T T H E Y R E S A Y I N G A B O U T . . . T H E W O R K Individual commission if you make your monthly budgets easy to make. Juggling multiple customers can be hard as you really need to focus on one person at a time, to avoid loss of stock. The team environment, inhouse training and staff benefits are fantastic. T H E S T A F F The people are amazing to work with, we bounce off each other. Great working environments with positive staff. Fantastic top managers and company owners. Best mentors and role models. C H A L L E N G E S Working Christmas. At first, learning about the jewellery. Sometimes difficult customers, however great management that helps in a situation. O V E R A L L R A T I N G 97 per cent of current and former employees would recommend working at Prouds Jewellers to a friend. 95 per cent of 39 reviewers rate salaries as high or average. The working environment was rated its best feature. VISIT SEEK.COM.AU TO READ MORE COMPANY REVIEWS VACANCIES C O N S T R U C T I O N L E A D S A D R I S E NEW BRIGADE: Jeweller Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is half the average age of others in the field. Picture: KYLIE ELSE Your destination for career advice blue collarwith 10 CLASSIFIEDS SATURDAY NOVEMBER 19 2016 COURIERMAIL.COM.AU Steve Earley (07) 3666 6415 steve.earley@news.com.au Business Development Manager (Recruiters/Corporate) Work with me to find your best candidate Australia-wide Hello, my name is Steve Earley. As an Account Manager specialising in corporate recruitment and recruitment agency advertising Im available to advise you on the most targeted active and passive candidate solutions across the News Corp print and digital network. My goal is help you to attract and place the best candidate and have access to an Australia wide talent pool. Contact me during business hours and Ill be happy to help you! PROSPECTS UNEARTHED FOR WOMEN IN MINING AN online mentoring program to help women succeed in the resources industry and encourage more gender diversity will run until at least mid-2018. The Federal Government will provide an extra $490,000 to ensure the Australian Women in Resources Alliances e-Mentoring Program survives. The program already has connected more than 200 women with experienced male and female mentors since funding started in 2013. Australian Mines and Metals Association industry services executive director Tara Diamond says it not only will help female workers but support the industry to be more competitive through workforce diversity. The resource industry is heavily male-dominated, with women comprising just 17 per cent of the national workforce compared to 46 per cent across all industries, Diamond says. Despite a challenging operating environment, the resource industry still employs almost 100,000 more people compared to 10 years ago, and opportunities abound for women to play a greater role in the industrys growing production capacity. As the only national program offering mentoring to women via an online platform, AWRA e-Mentoring is breaking down the barriers that in the past have prevented some women receiving valuable professional guidance, such as remote locations and non-traditional work schedules. The program will continue to be a critical part of the resource industrys multifaceted approach to support the career development of women across multiple occupations. This is particularly in technical and trade roles in which women have been traditionally underemployed. R E A D E R R E V I E W S JOB ads in construction are up 13 per cent this year compared to last year, driven by growth in mainland southern and eastern states. Queensland had a 19 per cent increase year-on-year. SEEKs Employment Trends Report finds at least a 30 per cent spike in the number of ads listed for plant and machinery operators, contracts managers and health, safety and environment workers, which were the top three growing sub-sectors. SEEK Australia and New Zealand managing director Michael Ilczynski says all sub-sectors of construction recorded growth except its smallest sector, quality assurance and control, which made up less than 1 per cent of all jobs anyway. Project managers, contract administrators, estimators, forepersons and site managers were in shortage, reflected in the SEEK data as the jobs with the greatest number of new ads. Ilczynski says the Rider Levett Bucknall Crane Index also proved construction was at record levels. The latest index has reported a record of 663 tower cranes across Australia for Quarter 3, 2016, with 90 per cent of cranes on eastern seaboard projects and 81 per cent of all cranes on new residential developments, he says. These Index statistics help support the growth trend weve seen in construction job ads on SEEK this October. Brisbanes strong housing market was fuelling work for estimators and other front-end construction workers as well as supervisors. Overall the number of job advertisements on SEEK across all industries was up 3.9 per cent compared to last October. THREE of the oldesttrades toolmaking,canvas and leathermak-ing, and jewellery mak-ing also have the oldestworkforces of any trade. Employment Department data shows the median age of canvas and leathergoods makers is 54, toolmakers and engineering patternmakers is 52, and jewellers is 51. Trades has a younger age profile than the total workforce, with just 34 per cent of workers aged 45 years and over, compared with 39 per cent for all occupations. While the canvas/leathermaker workforce is projected to remain stable in the next five years, growth is forecast for toolmakers (300 new jobs) and jewellers (200 new jobs), providing opportunities for younger people eager to break into the roles. As both trades have small workforces of about 5000 people employed each, it equals between 4 and 7 per cent growth. Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is among the new brigade of jewellers showing sparkle, winning the silver medal in the WorldSkills national competition last month. From a young age I loved jewellery, looking at it and making it, she says. When I was about 12 my mum and I went into Ruby Tuesday Jewellery, and it was then that I decided I wanted to be a jeweller. Through high school I chose subjects that allowed me to make jewellery and I had a very supportive teacher. She started a bachelor degree but when the course structure changed to no longer focus on jewellery, she found another path an apprenticeship at the same jeweller which inspired her career. She completed a Certificate III in Jewellery Manufacture qualification. OLD-SCHOOL COOL Cara Jenkin discovers there are jobs in making a living the old-fashioned way T R A D E S W H A T T H E Y R E S A Y I N G A B O U T . . . T H E W O R K Individual commission if you make your monthly budgets easy to make. Juggling multiple customers can be hard as you really need to focus on one person at a time, to avoid loss of stock. The team environment, inhouse training and staff benefits are fantastic. T H E S T A F F The people are amazing to work with, we bounce off each other. Great working environments with positive staff. Fantastic top managers and company owners. Best mentors and role models. C H A L L E N G E S Working Christmas. At first, learning about the jewellery. Sometimes difficult customers, however great management that helps in a situation. O V E R A L L R A T I N G 97 per cent of current and former employees would recommend working at Prouds Jewellers to a friend. 95 per cent of 39 reviewers rate salaries as high or average. The working environment was rated its best feature. VISIT SEEK.COM.AU TO READ MORE COMPANY REVIEWS VACANCIES C O N S T R U C T I O N L E A D S A D R I S E NEW BRIGADE: Jeweller Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is half the average age of others in the field. Picture: KYLIE ELSE Your destination for career advice blue collarwith 10 CLASSIFIEDS SATURDAY NOVEMBER 19 2016 COURIERMAIL.COM.AU Steve Earley (07) 3666 6415 steve.earley@news.com.au Business Development Manager (Recruiters/Corporate) Work with me to find your best candidate Australia-wide Hello, my name is Steve Earley. As an Account Manager specialising in corporate recruitment and recruitment agency advertising Im available to advise you on the most targeted active and passive candidate solutions across the News Corp print and digital network. My goal is help you to attract and place the best candidate and have access to an Australia wide talent pool. Contact me during business hours and Ill be happy to help you! PROSPECTS UNEARTHED FOR WOMEN IN MINING AN online mentoring program to help women succeed in the resources industry and encourage more gender diversity will run until at least mid-2018. The Federal Government will provide an extra $490,000 to ensure the Australian Women in Resources Alliances e-Mentoring Program survives. The program already has connected more than 200 women with experienced male and female mentors since funding started in 2013. Australian Mines and Metals Association industry services executive director Tara Diamond says it not only will help female workers but support the industry to be more competitive through workforce diversity. The resource industry is heavily male-dominated, with women comprising just 17 per cent of the national workforce compared to 46 per cent across all industries, Diamond says. Despite a challenging operating environment, the resource industry still employs almost 100,000 more people compared to 10 years ago, and opportunities abound for women to play a greater role in the industrys growing production capacity. As the only national program offering mentoring to women via an online platform, AWRA e-Mentoring is breaking down the barriers that in the past have prevented some women receiving valuable professional guidance, such as remote locations and non-traditional work schedules. The program will continue to be a critical part of the resource industrys multifaceted approach to support the career development of women across multiple occupations. This is particularly in technical and trade roles in which women have been traditionally underemployed. R E A D E R R E V I E W S JOB ads in construction are up 13 per cent this year compared to last year, driven by growth in mainland southern and eastern states. Queensland had a 19 per cent increase year-on-year. SEEKs Employment Trends Report finds at least a 30 per cent spike in the number of ads listed for plant and machinery operators, contracts managers and health, safety and environment workers, which were the top three growing sub-sectors. SEEK Australia and New Zealand managing director Michael Ilczynski says all sub-sectors of construction recorded growth except its smallest sector, quality assurance and control, which made up less than 1 per cent of all jobs anyway. Project managers, contract administrators, estimators, forepersons and site managers were in shortage, reflected in the SEEK data as the jobs with the greatest number of new ads. Ilczynski says the Rider Levett Bucknall Crane Index also proved construction was at record levels. The latest index has reported a record of 663 tower cranes across Australia for Quarter 3, 2016, with 90 per cent of cranes on eastern seaboard projects and 81 per cent of all cranes on new residential developments, he says. These Index statistics help support the growth trend weve seen in construction job ads on SEEK this October. Brisbanes strong housing market was fuelling work for estimators and other front-end construction workers as well as supervisors. Overall the number of job advertisements on SEEK across all industries was up 3.9 per cent compared to last October. THREE of the oldesttrades toolmaking,canvas and leathermak-ing, and jewellery mak-ing also have the oldestworkforces of any trade. Employment Department data shows the median age of canvas and leathergoods makers is 54, toolmakers and engineering patternmakers is 52, and jewellers is 51. Trades has a younger age profile than the total workforce, with just 34 per cent of workers aged 45 years and over, compared with 39 per cent for all occupations. While the canvas/leathermaker workforce is projected to remain stable in the next five years, growth is forecast for toolmakers (300 new jobs) and jewellers (200 new jobs), providing opportunities for younger people eager to break into the roles. As both trades have small workforces of about 5000 people employed each, it equals between 4 and 7 per cent growth. Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is among the new brigade of jewellers showing sparkle, winning the silver medal in the WorldSkills national competition last month. From a young age I loved jewellery, looking at it and making it, she says. When I was about 12 my mum and I went into Ruby Tuesday Jewellery, and it was then that I decided I wanted to be a jeweller. Through high school I chose subjects that allowed me to make jewellery and I had a very supportive teacher. She started a bachelor degree but when the course structure changed to no longer focus on jewellery, she found another path an apprenticeship at the same jeweller which inspired her career. She completed a Certificate III in Jewellery Manufacture qualification. OLD-SCHOOL COOL Cara Jenkin discovers there are jobs in making a living the old-fashioned way T R A D E S W H A T T H E Y R E S A Y I N G A B O U T . . . T H E W O R K Individual commission if you make your monthly budgets easy to make. Juggling multiple customers can be hard as you really need to focus on one person at a time, to avoid loss of stock. The team environment, inhouse training and staff benefits are fantastic. T H E S T A F F The people are amazing to work with, we bounce off each other. Great working environments with positive staff. Fantastic top managers and company owners. Best mentors and role models. C H A L L E N G E S Working Christmas. At first, learning about the jewellery. Sometimes difficult customers, however great management that helps in a situation. O V E R A L L R A T I N G 97 per cent of current and former employees would recommend working at Prouds Jewellers to a friend. 95 per cent of 39 reviewers rate salaries as high or average. The working environment was rated its best feature. VISIT SEEK.COM.AU TO READ MORE COMPANY REVIEWS VACANCIES C O N S T R U C T I O N L E A D S A D R I S E NEW BRIGADE: Jeweller Chloe Biddiscombe, 24, is half the average age of others in the field. Picture: KYLIE ELSE Your destination for career advice blue collarwith Your destination for career advice with ::l::. seek Protds THE J E W ELLERS