Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Fri 19 Aug 2016

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Fri 19 Aug 2016

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2016-08-19

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00173

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/263070

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/473138

Page content

30 REAL ESTATE FRIDAY AUGUST 19 2016 CAVE01Z01MA - V1 MOVING house can be a very disorienting experience, one thats often made worse if youre moving miles away from your familiar suburb where your local barista knows your daily order and your dog has a favourite digging spot at the park down the road. The only way to overcome this is to throw yourself in head first and make the effort to fall in love with your new suburb. The aim is to feel truly at home in your new digs and the best place to start is with the surrounding streets. Heres some ways to uncover an urban hood and shake that newbie feeling. Theres no better way to check out your new suburb than to strap on your walking shoes and pound the pavement. Dont play it safe. Walk around all the backstreets to discover beautiful architecture, hole-in- the-wall cafes or a stunning river walk. Try it on a Saturday to get a true feel for the neighbourhood. Weekends are when primary schools become second-hand markets, town halls become book fairs and local parks become outdoor yoga classes. Find the closest farmers market and score great food, new friends and more local knowledge. Also try cycling if you can; you can cover more distance that way. Local markets can be a great way to get to know your neighbourhood. When you see your fellow suburb buddies with a cardboard coffee cup or a plastic bag of takeaway containers, ask them where they got it from. Theyll probably be only too delighted to tell you its from the amazing Italian deli on the corner, or the Pho place from three streets over. Word of mouth recommendations are always the best. How often do you walk past telegraph poles or walls that are plastered with posters and you barely raise an eyebrow? Start paying attention to the advertisements in your local area. You could find the perfect pilates course around the corner from your house or an underground film festival at your local bar. The poles are where its happening. Most people find the closest supermarket to their house and shop there exclusively, but a great way to get to know your neighbourhood is to mix it up. Buy your herbs from the green grocer, get your bread from the nearby bakery. Be careful not to fall into lazy habits too quickly or you might never discover the amazing antipasto at the Greek supermarket or the perfect pork sausages at the butcher down the road. Its literally your agents job to sell that suburb, so pick their brains for information. Agents are likely to live locally or at least spend a large percentage of time in the areas they sell for. Theyll know the best places to get brunch, have a business shirt dry cleaned and which park is the best for a Sunday Uncover your hood afternoon picnic with family and friends. In short, act like a tourist until you feel like a local Make a rule that when you eat out, you arent allowed to eat at the same place twice for a while. Try a different cuisine on a regular basis and youre certain to discover new tastes, sights and services. Make a different rule to try a new thing once a week (or once a month if youre too busy). Check those posters for ideas. Try lots of different places to eat or drink. Scope out the essentials Find your closest hospital, doctor, police station, vet and 24-hour chemist. Theres something comforting and homely about knowing where to go if you need midnight cold and flu relief or a place to take your sick pet. You may never use the dentist thats right across the road but knowing that its there will make you feel right at home. Tap the tribal mind and hit up places like Zomato, Yelp or Foursquare for reviews and recommendations in your area. You can download the apps on your smartphone and browse for points of interest within a desired distance from your new place. In short, act like a tourist until you feel like a local. CARLY JACOBS Markets around the world serve as an unofficial information kiosk with many neighbourly hints offered. Chinese are smart CHINESE buyers are increasingly beating locals to the punch at auctions and its not just because they have more cash to throw around, according to one leading auctioneer. James Pratt, director of auctions for Raine & Horne and J Pratt Realty, says the skill set of Chinese buyers at auctions is absolutely through the roof compared with a few years ago. Four or five years ago there were always buyers agents or interpreters there with them, he said. Now Im seeing really high-performance bidding from Chinese whose second language is English. That means coming with a clear set of tactics rather than just hoping for the best, he said. Gavin Norris, chief executive of Chinese international property website Juwai.com, said Chinese buyers were frequently nervous about auctions up until a few years ago. Australia is one of the countries where Chinese buyers are most likely to encounter an auction its much less likely in the UK, the US or Canada, he said. They often had someone who would interpret for them. Today, he said, Chinese buyers are among the most sophisticated at auctions. Its not because they overpay, he said. Its because, like every smart buyer, they fight for every dollar.


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