Territory Stories

Sunday Territorian 12 Jun 2016

Details:

Title

Sunday Territorian 12 Jun 2016

Collection

Sunday Territorian; NewspaperNT

Date

2016-06-12

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/262721

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/477807

Page content

SUNDAY JUNE 12 2016 MEN'S HEALTH WEEK FEATURE 51 V1 - NTNE01Z01MA Mens Health Expo Rain Tree Park Wednesday 15 June 10:00am to 2:00 pm Fathers & Kids FlicNics Free screening of Happy Feet Goyder Square Palmerston Thursday 16 June 7:00pm to 8:30pm Mitchell Centre Walking Group Meet at Mitchell Centre Information Desk Friday 7:30am to 8:30am Contact: Gay 8927 6400 Events scheduled for Mens Health Week: For more information visit www.nt.gov.au/health HEALTHY MEN STRONG FAMILIES Mens Health Week LIVING WITH PURPOSE, BUILDING ON HEALTH Tonys small earthmoving business was parked up and he hit the road over the next two years spreading awareness of mens health issues and the importance of recognising and acting on signs and signals. Tony embarked on many adventures along his journey with cancer and maintained an incredibly strong mindset and will power until his passing in November 2015 surrounded by family and friends. His infectious personality and storytelling ways empowered and inspired many people he met. His family continue to use his journey and story to share love, support and inspiration to those in a journey of their own and to provide much needed knowledge and understanding around the importance of mens health. For more information on mens health visit w w w . h e a l t h . n t . g o v . a u / mens_health Mens Health Week is all about making the right choices, whether it be doing some yoga or making healthy food selections Keeping your health in check WHEN men allow their health to deteriorate they are not the only ones who suffer their families suffer too. That is why the theme of Mens Health Week 2016, running June 13 19, is Healthy Men, Strong Families. On Wednesday, June 15 the Department of Health has organised for a Mens Health Expo to be held at Rain Tree Park from 10am to 2pm. One of the key attractions will be the Department of Veterans Affairs Pit Stop Program. The Pit Stop is a mens preventive health program designed to provide quick and easy tests to ensure mens motors are running well. Men are encouraged to stop in and check their oil pressure (blood pressure), or whether their chassis (waist measurement) is in good shape, and participate in a variety of other tests to determine whether they pass the pits. The Pit Stop is fast, free, and easy, and every man who participates will also go in the draw to win a double pass to the V8 supercars or vouchers to Bunnings and BCF. The Pit Stop is dedicated to Arthur Anthony, who died of prostate cancer in 2015. He was very motivated to get men talking about, and acting on, their health. Tonys family said he was a long term Territorian who raised his two daughters with his wife Debbie on a rural property in Darwin. Tony became aware of changes to his urine flow over a course of weeks in May 2013. After a visit to the doctor it was established that his prostate was severely enlarged, to the size of a tennis ball it should be the size of a walnut which lead to the immediate need for a catheter. Over the following six weeks Tony underwent scans, biopsies and testing that showed he had an aggressive form of cancer to the prostate that had spread throughout the bone, meaning that chemo therapy was not an option. From these results he became a man on a mission. Safety first to stop diseases THIS year is NT Aids and Hepatitis Councils 30th year as an incorporated body. For 30 years it has been advocating for people to use condoms and hygienic injecting equipment to prevent the transmission of HIV. Now there are some new ways, added to condom use, that enable people to stay HIV negative. One is called PEP, which stands for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis. PEP is a month-long course of drugs to help prevent HIV infection that is taken after a possible exposure to HIV. The sooner someone starts PEP the better, but it must be started within 72 hours after a possible exposure to HIV. You then take PEP regularly for 28 days. PEP isnt guaranteed to work but does in the majority of cases. So if you are HIV negative, and have engaged in some risky behaviour, you can go to the emergency department of the hospital as soon as possible, and ask for PEP. Whats a risky behaviour? Sex without a condom with a person who has, or might have, HIV; condom breaking or slipping off during sex; sharing needles or syringes with a person who has, or might have, HIV. NTAHC in Darwin and Alice Springs have Care and Support workers who can help you. If you need support going to the emergency department or if you want a better understanding of risk-taking behaviour call them to make an appointment or even talk about it over the phone. President of NTAHC, Dr Peter Kay (pictured), said people can speak freely at NTAHC. Everything is confidential, and the staff are trained to be non-judgmental. Aboriginal people, migrants from around the world, gay men, men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs, LGBTQI communities and sex workers are all welcome into the offices, he said. Talk to NTAHC staff for more info or go to: www.getpep.info The use of condoms can help to prevent the spread of HIV


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

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