Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Fri 11 Mar 2016

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Fri 11 Mar 2016

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2016-03-11

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00317

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/261479

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/487071

Page content

14 NEWS FRIDAY MARCH 11 2016 CAVE01Z01MA - V1 A HUGE demand for translation and interpreting services was the inspiration for a new course involving students at Centralian Middle School. Linguist David Moore spotted the growing gap in the market and is now working alongside an Arrernte teacher to provide training in translation, which focuses on the written aspect of the childrens language skills with a vocational emphasis. Theres lots of work to do in scripts, book translations interpreting, liaison work, cultural advising on communities and in town, working at the hospitals in Centrelink and in court, Mr Moore said. At the moment the translation course deals only in Central and Eastern Arrernte but its hoped in time other languages could be added. We organise excursions to workplaces. Our last one was to ABC News and all of these students watched an interpreter translate the news into Walpiri, Mr Moore said. Daveena Campbell is among the small group of year nine students involved. Not many people get to learn and speak it, Miss Campbell said. Elsewhere in Australia languages die. Perhaps a case in point, Mr Moore said he was one of only two people able to interpret the Alyawarr language, spoken in the Utopia region. He said the schools students had a natural advantage in interpreting Arrern te as they were already engaged with language in the Aboriginal community. Its classic economics, if someone does something well they have a comparative advantage and they should make use of that, Mr Moore said. We have to make the link with the world outside and the potential there is for them not to be an underclass but for them to have a comparative advantage. Centralian Middle School principal Eddie Fabijan said he felt very proud of what had been achieved through the Alice Springs Language Centre, which is on the school site. Were hopefully adding value through visits and it will dawn on the kids in the next few months that this is really important, he said. Arrernte interpreters in the making Andrea Johnston LEFT: Centralian Middle School principal Eddie Fabijan and translator David Moore. ABOVE: Students Francis Bruce, Beau Lord, Stanley Byrne, Daveena Campbell and Darnell Campbell taking part in the Arrernte interpreting course. Picture: JUSTIN KENNEDY MUSTERING young back into the beef industry is the focus of the Future Northern Territory Cattlemens Association program. Applications for the 2016 program have closed, with successful participants to be announced at this years NTCA conference on March 17-18. NTCA executive Tom Ryan said harnessing the younger generation was essential to the industrys future. The industry is changing so rap idly and the future generation is critical to maintaining that longevity, he said. It is also an opportunity for them to work with the current generation about what is already effective. The Future NTCA Program seeks one candidate from each of the four NTCA Branches Central Australia, Barkly, Katherine and Top End prior to the annual AGM and conference each year. It was established in 2014 and is open to people aged 16-35 who are involved in the cattle industry. Program participants undertake personal and leadership development courses. Mr Ryan said the program started after the ongoing rhetoric that young people were leaving the industry and the average age of farmers was increasing. It can be tough for young people breaking into the industry, he said. It is about how we can integrate the new generation and ideas with a lot to learn from established practices. He said the Northern Territory Government hold a two-day workshop in August each year for the Future NTCA to understand how the Government and industry operates. Previous successes of the program include rural mental health awareness through the Barry the Bike campaign and a Youth in the NT Beef industry survey that gauged pressing issues facing young workers in the industry. A session called Emerging New Ideas for Established Practices will be held for the Future NTCA at this years conference. Drive for young cattlemen New blood crucial to industryTom Volling For General News and Sport Advertising call 8950 9730 or email ads@aliceadvocate.com.au. For Classified Advertising call 1300 508 509 or email cenclassies@aliceadvocate.com.au. Or call into our office at 2 Gap Road. PubliCAtioN dAte thursday 24th March. General News & Sport Advertising: 12 noon Tuesday 22nd March Classified Advertising: Display Ads 10am Tuesday 22nd March Block Ads 12 noon Tuesday 22nd March Line Ads 10am Wednesday 23rd March PubliCAtioN dAte tuesday 29th March. General News & Sport Advertising: 12 noon Wednesday 23rd March Classified Advertising: Display Ads 10am Wednesday 23rd March Block Ads 12 noon Wednesday 23rd March Line Ads 10am Thursday 24th March EastEr advErtising DeaDlines Short or long term packageS to Suit your needS. Conveniently located with easy access. For enquiries phone 8953 5907 or email info@primecuts.com.au Freezer STOrAGe AvAilAble


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