Territory Stories

Casuarina Coastal Reserve Management Plan

Details:

Title

Casuarina Coastal Reserve Management Plan

Collection

Parks and Wildlife Commission of the NT reports; Reports; PublicationNT; reports

Date

2016-04

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Language

English

Subject

National parks and reserves -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals; Parks and Wildlife Commission of the Northern Territory -- Periodicals

Publisher name

Parks and Wildlife Commission of the Northern Territory

Place of publication

Alice Springs (N.T.)

ISBN

9780992569327

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/261282

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/488539

Page content

Casuarina Coastal Reserve Management Plan April 2016 Page 21 The Experience Development Plan proposes improving the sense of arrival and ownership through the installation of two large entry signs at Dripstone Cliffs and Lee Point. The Parks and Wildlife Commission will work with the relevant Government department to develop a signage plan for the main roads leading to the Reserve (e.g. Trower and Lee Point Roads). Directional signage is an important element to ensure visitors have a safe and relaxing visit. The Parks and Wildlife Commission will continue to review and improve the directional signage in the Reserve. Good visitor information that shapes visitor expectations and behaviour will assist in reducing incidence of injury to visitors. Walking track signage and interpretation in the Reserve could be improved to enhance the visitor experience. Visitor Monitoring In early 2015, four vehicle traffic counters were installed in the Reserve. These counters will provide quantitative information. The collection of qualitative information such as visitor satisfaction, profile and use of the Reserve is also important information. Visitor monitoring is essential in improving knowledge and understanding of visitor behaviour. It helps improve park management and is necessary for conserving values of the Reserve. 2.9 Litter and Waste Outcome A clean and tidy Reserve. As the NTs most visited park or reserve, a lot of visitor waste is generated. There are approximately 25 rubbish bins in the Reserve but not all the litter finds its way into them. Rangers conduct regular patrols of the picnic areas and walking tracks and also the beach but some discarded items go unnoticed. These can pose a risk to public safety and also wildlife. Discarded plastics, aluminium cans and glass containers are particularly hazardous. Interpretive signs can enhance the visitor experience Management Actions Investigate opportunities for community members and volunteers to assist in providing interpretation in the Reserve to enhance the visitor experience. Implement the Experience Development Plan to improve the sense of arrival through the installation of two large entry signs at Dripstone Cliffs and Lee Point. Work with the relevant Government department to develop a signage plan for the main roads leading to the Reserve. Review and upgrade directional signage to ensure visitors are able to locate Park facilities. Improve track signage and markers. Carry out visitor surveys approximately every three years in accordance with the Parks and Wildlife Visitor Monitoring Program.


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