Territory Stories

The Northern Territory news Wed 7 Oct 2015

Details:

Title

The Northern Territory news Wed 7 Oct 2015

Other title

NT news

Collection

The Northern Territory news; NewspaperNT

Date

2015-10-07

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin

Publisher name

News Corp Australia

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

News Corp Australia

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/258542

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/502565

Page content

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 7 2015 NEWS 11 V1 - NTNE01Z01MA continuing to burn in culturally and environmentally sensitive areas within Kakadus floodplain and stone country, the statement read. Parks Australia will continue to work closely with ERA and other regional stakeholders and agencies to improve formal arrangements for co-operative fire management to minimise the risks to Kakadus World Heritage natural and cultural values, property Kakadu blaze sparks uproar A FIRE that began in the Territorys Ranger uranium mine has spread into Kakadu National Park, threatening sensitive areas of the World Heritage-listed landmark. Nourlangie Rock, an important site within the park, has been closed for public safety as Parks Australia works with mine operator Energy Resources of Australia (ERA) to manage the flames. ERA was undertaking weed management burning from Thursday, but the fire spread despite management from the ground and the air. Parks Australia, responsible for Kakadus management, said in a statement it had no approval role as ERA were permitted to conduct any burn-off activity on their own site. Despite ground and aerial fire management, the fire is and assets, and public safety. An ERA spokesman told the NT News internal protocols were followed and Parks Australia was notified the day before the planned hazard reduction burn. He said there was no information from Parks Australia advising against it, and that no fire ban was in place for the area at the time. Environment Centre NTs Lauren Mellor said the fire danger rating on the day of the blaze was set at very high with expected wind gusts up to 55km/h. ERA must be held responsible for the enormous ecological damage this fire has wrought on the unique and fragile landscapes of the park, and prosecuted for its reckless fire and mine-site management, she said. ERA is carrying out an internal investigation of the incident. KATINA VANGOPOULOS ERA must be held responsible for the ... damage this fire has wrought Toxic metal link to dip in schooling A NEW study has found a link between areas contaminated by mining chemicals such as lead and arsenic and poor school results. Researchers from Sydneys Macquarie University found schoolchildren in the NSW mining town of Broken Hill who were exposed to contaminants such as lead and arsenic were more than twice as likely to have issues with two or more areas of development. Students in Years 3 and 5 in the most contaminated areas performed worse than peers from cleaner parts of the town. Study co-author Mark Taylor called for pollution regulations to be reviewed. I think most of all its a message to say that current regulations clearly appear to be inadequate, Mr Taylor said. Less-detailed research outlined in the study found children in Mount Isa in Queensland and Port Pirie in South Australia were also more likely to perform below the national average. Solar power boost for Lilla campsite A SOLAR-powered campsite is to be developed at the Lilla Aboriginal outstation in the Watarrka National Park. The project will be developed by Remote Education Tours (RET) with a $21,000 Territory Government tourism infrastructure grant. As part of the development solar lighting will be installed. The Lilla Educational Campground near Kings Canyon hosts hundreds of interstate schoolchildren who come to Central Australia each year to learn about indigenous culture. Reg Ramsden from RET said the solar campsite project was good news for the business. Id like to thank the NT Government for their assistance because having solar power at the campsite will help in a number of ways including teaching kids about renewable energy, Mr Ramsden said. It will also help to save money from not having to pur chase diesel fuel and enhance the visitor experience by not having a noisy generator. I think it will also improve safety for visitors as lighting will be more expansive than current coverage and support local business that will install and service the solar power infrastructure. RET wont rest on our laurels and we will continue to improve our products, visitor experience, campsites and promote indigenous culture. Calan Pridham, Sarah Brown and Esther Herry are three of the five Parap Pumper Jumpers heading to Sweden for the world skipping championships next year Picture: ISABELLA MOORE Kids jump for joy SKIPPING has earned a bunch of Darwin schoolkids a trip to Sweden for the 2016 World Rope Skipping Championships. Five members of the Parap Pumper Jumpers a group of current and former students from Parap Primary School were selected for their performances at the Australian Championships in Canberra this month. Team manager Claire George said the students were thrilled to have been selected off the back of a huge improvement on their 2014 championships results. Last year we got one bronze in one category this year we got medals in 18 categories, she said. It showed they worked hard and stepped up this year. The skippers performed in solo, pairs and group routines choreographed to music. They are then judged in a similar way to gymnastic competitions, The students also competed in speed and endurance skipping competitions. Ms George said four of the five members of the team Hermine Strohmayr, 13, Esther Herry, 14, Eliza Pridham, 15 and Sarah Brown, 18 qualified in the teams event, while Calan Pridham, 13, qualified as a soloist. Team coach Kim Rowe, who has been training the Pumper Jumper squad for about 13 years, said the students should be proud of themselves. Skipping is a fantastic sport it builds strength, endurance and co-ordination and allows children to be creative and have fun, she said. They are simply amazing athletes. DAMIEN McCARTNEY My name is Amy Page And I am a Real Estate Agent with 0409 884 451 amy.page@elders.com.au


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