Territory Stories

Community Benefit Fund annual report 2013-2014

Details:

Title

Community Benefit Fund annual report 2013-2014

Creator

Northern Territory. Department of Business. Gambling and Licensing Services

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT; Community Benefit Fund annual report; Annual Report

Date

2014

Notes

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Language

English

Subject

Community Benefit Fund; Periodical; Charitie; Finance; Public welfare; Gambling; Social aspect; Annual report

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Darwin

Series

Community Benefit Fund annual report; Annual Report

Volume

2013/2014

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Northern Territory Government

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/256337

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/521226

Related items

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/521228

Page content

Major Community Grants The Major Community Grants Program was established in 2008-09 to provide funding support to not for profit Northern Territory based organisations for community development and improvement purposes. The maximum grant available for each project is $200,000. In 2013-14, five organisations were funded a total of $260,000 as follows: Yulara Ayers Rock Lion Club Inc received funding of $162,000 to construct a community park and playground; Groote Eylandt & Milyakburra Youth Development Unit Inc received $28,000 for the Sharing Knowledge Sharing time project ; Alawa Aboriginal Corporation received funding of $25,000 for the Minyerri football oval water supply project; InCite Youth Arts Incorporated received funding of $25,000 for the InCite / Warlpiri Youth Development Aboriginal Corporation Community Development Program; and The Genealogical Society of the Northern Territory Inc received funding of $20,000 to purchase a ScanPro 3000 and additional software to fast track research and enhance networking and distribution of historical data. Community Organisation Grants (small grants) Community Organisation grants are available to support projects which have the potential to improve the wellbeing and lifestyle of Territorians. Funding for a wide range of purposes may be provided to eligible not for profit Territory based community organisations. Funding is generally limited to amounts of $5,000 or less, although higher amounts may be approved under specified conditions outlined in the grant guidelines. Funding is provided for non-recurrent expenditure and is available only for clearly identified projects which can be completed within specified time frames. Greater consideration is given to priority issues such as level of existing community support and circumstances such as remoteness or high levels of socio-economic disadvantage. Preference is also given to requests for lower value amounts. This combined approach allows for an equitable distribution of available funds throughout the Northern Territory to as many worthwhile projects as possible. Table 2 provides a regional summary of applications received and approved. Table 2: Community Organisations Grants (small grants) approved in 2012-13 and 2013-14 - Summary by Region Region Applications Received Amount Requested $ Amount Approved $ Number Approved 2012-13 2013-14 2012-13 2013-14 2012-13 2013-14 2012-13 2013-14 Arnhem 19 13 77,620 59,578 55,604 56,865 18 12 Barkly 19 5 77,838 21,554 59,538 21,554 16 5 Central 42 36 166,050 134,985 120,921 116,755 37 32 Katherine 26 17 97,824 67,866 80,751 57,866 25 15 Multi-Region 22 10 109,185 34,905 68,157 34,905 21 10 Northern 140 121 547,522 458,024 320,219 391,683 111 107 Total 268 202 1,076,038 776,912 705,189 679,628 228 181 Page | 7


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