Territory Stories

Sunday Territorian 25 Jan 2015

Details:

Title

Sunday Territorian 25 Jan 2015

Collection

Sunday Territorian; NewspaperNT

Date

2015-01-25

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/254822

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/528139

Page content

SUNDAY JANUARY 25 2015 TRAVEL 39 V1 - NTNE01Z01MA Escape www.escape.com.au08 ESCAPE SUNDAY JANUARY 18 2015 ESCAPE.COM.AU TELE01Z01ES - V1 started barking feverishly. She looked down to see a snake at her feet. Since then, Buster has barely left her side, except to hang out with guests when shes busy. Our 15-day Kimberley Complete APT tour begins in Broome, continues along the 650km Gibb River Rd to Kununurra, before returning via the Bungle Bungles. Most days involve hiking to waterfalls, swimming in clear pools and stopping in scenic locations for an outdoor lunch. Bell Gorge, Galvans Gorge, Barnett River, King Edward River, Emma Gorge each swimming hole seems more beautiful than the one before. We also see the 1500-yearold Boab Prison Tree, 14m in diameter, where Aboriginal prisoners were chained before being sentenced in the town of Derby. Non-indigenous APT guide George tells tales about Aboriginal warrior Jandamarra, who fought the whites who colonised the land and killed many of his countrymen. They include Windjana Gorge, site of a shootout in the 1890s. It is now a peaceful tourist site where we stop to admire fossils of shellfish in a rock wall and see dozens of freshwater crocodiles sunbathing on the creek bank. At Tunnel Creek, where Jandamarra was eventually killed by a black trooper, we wade through ice-cold water up to our knees inside a chasm, admiring the limestone overhangings above. The Kimberley is also dotted with cattle stations that stretch for thousands of kilometres. Many are sourcing more and more of their income from tourism. The night is spent at Home Valley Station. Set against the backdrop of the Cockburn Ranges, the station is owned by the Indigenous Land Corporation, which helps Aboriginal people buy and manage land. Our 20-year-old guide Alfie, one of seven Indigenous trainees at the station, is a Torres Strait Islander. After finishing school, he had been invited to work at Voyages Ayers Rock Resort in the Northern Territory as a painter as part of the organisations onsite training program. Wellspoken and with a pleasant nature, Alfie was identified as having potential and asked to move to the Kimberley to train as a guide. He leads us on a walk, encouraging us to try boab nut; they are high in vitamin C, have the same properties as antimalarial medication and can be used to make custard. It has a salty flavour, similar to popcorn. At El Questro Wilderness Parks Zebedee Springs, there are soaring orange sandstone cliffs; tiny frogs hop along rocks while dragonflies float above and butterflies twitter around us in what appears to be a courtship ritual. The thermal springs are a series of rock pools linked by tiny waterfalls with water as clear as glass, the springs are a true oasis. The Kimberley is a bird lovers paradise but the thing I will remember most are the colours dusty orange roads, towering red rock escarpments, black bushfire-charred eucalyptus trees and bright yellow capok flowers against clear blue skies. The writer was a guest of APT. lamb cutlets and vegetables before mustering around the campfire. Buster, the camps adopted dog from the neighbouring Kandiwal community, nestles at my feet. A few nights earlier, Gavins pregnant wife, Lucie, who also works at the camp, had been walking home through the bushes with Buster when he IAM woken by the morning light and the first sounds of the day: birds singing in the trees, the zipping and unzipping of surrounding tents and the jovial banter of other guests making their way to breakfast. Im warm and cosy under the blanket in my luxury tent but the cold air pierces my exposed cheeks. This is the Kimberley, however, and things change quickly. A few hours later, Im hiking under a scorching sun behind indigenous guide Gavin en route to Mitchell Falls. We pass a sacred burial site and climb down to a cave to see Aboriginal rock art depicting, among other things, a longneck turtle, kangaroos, fish, yams and a handprint that belonged to Gavins grandfather, a respected elder of the Wnanbal people. Gavin points out a cool part of the cave where his ancestors would carve spears. We stop to fill our bottles at an overhanging rock behind a waterfall where ferns grow through the cracks. Continuing our walk towards Big Merten Falls, we pause to learn about cinchona trees, from which our lands traditional owners extracted quinine to cure toothaches. We scramble up and down rocks and have to take our shoes off to cross a river, hopping from boulder to boulder. Mitchell Falls is the highest tiered waterfall in Western Australia and, on first view, stops me in my tracks. Water cascades down into a collection of pools. It is a truly magnificent sight. Swimming at Mitchell Falls is forbidden the site is sacred and legend says it is home to two creation snakes. However, a refreshing dip is taken at a nearby pool with a small waterfall. As we wait for the helicopter to take us on the short flight back to our 4WD, a cute spotted quoll scurries in between rocks nearby, lying in wait to feast on our crumbs. Upon returning to Mitchell Falls Wilderness Lodge a tranquil camp beside an emerald green billabong were welcomed with glasses of bubbly in celebration of fellow APT guest Wendys 50th birthday. That night, we dine on crocodile, emu and kangaroo canapes followed by a dinner of WESTERN AUSTRALIA Falling for outback wonders In the rugged Kimberley, Angela Saurine hikes to waterfalls, gorges and cattle stations along the Gibb River Road GETTING THERE Qantas flies to Broome from Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth. Ph 13 13 13 or see qantas.com TOURING THERE APTs 15-day Kimberley Complete small-group 4WD adventure is priced from $8395 a person. Most accommodation is in semipermanent tents, with wooden floorboards and corrugated iron walls separating the bathroom at APT-operated camps. Most meals are also included, with duck, barramundi and turkey among the impressive dinnertime offerings in such remote locations. A rotating seat system is enforced throughout the tour so you dont have people rushing to be first on the bus to snaffle the best seats. APT also provides a torch, water bottle, backpack and a small travel towel. Ph 1300 196 420 or see kimberleywilderness.com.au STAYING THERE Spend an extra night before or after your tour at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa, overlooking Cable Beach in Broome, where the tour starts and ends. Ph 1800 199 099 or see cablebeachclub.com WHEN TO GO The best time to visit is during the dry season from May to August when you can expect clear blue skies and sunshine during the day and cool nights. australiasnorthwest.com GO2 THE KIMBERLEY 08 ESCAPE SUNDAY JANUARY 18 2015 ESCAPE.COM.AU TELE01Z01ES - V1 started barking feverishly. She looked down to see a snake at her feet. Since then, Buster has barely left her side, except to hang out with guests when shes busy. Our 15-day Kimberley Complete APT tour begins in Broome, continues along the 650km Gibb River Rd to Kununurra, before returning via the Bungle Bungles. Most days involve hiking to waterfalls, swimming in clear pools and stopping in scenic locations for an outdoor lunch. Bell Gorge, Galvans Gorge, Barnett River, King Edward River, Emma Gorge each swimming hole seems more beautiful than the one before. We also see the 1500-yearold Boab Prison Tree, 14m in diameter, where Aboriginal prisoners were chained before being sentenced in the town of Derby. Non-indigenous APT guide George tells tales about Aboriginal warrior Jandamarra, who fought the whites who colonised the land and killed many of his countrymen. They include Windjana Gorge, site of a shootout in the 1890s. It is now a peaceful tourist site where we stop to admire fossils of shellfish in a rock wall and see dozens of freshwater crocodiles sunbathing on the creek bank. At Tunnel Creek, where Jandamarra was eventually killed by a black trooper, we wade through ice-cold water up to our knees inside a chasm, admiring the limestone overhangings above. The Kimberley is also dotted with cattle stations that stretch for thousands of kilometres. Many are sourcing more and more of their income from tourism. The night is spent at Home Valley Station. Set against the backdrop of the Cockburn Ranges, the station is owned by the Indigenous Land Corporation, which helps Aboriginal people buy and manage land. Our 20-year-old guide Alfie, one of seven Indigenous trainees at the station, is a Torres Strait Islander. After finishing school, he had been invited to work at Voyages Ayers Rock Resort in the Northern Territory as a painter as part of the organisations onsite training program. Wellspoken and with a pleasant nature, Alfie was identified as having potential and asked to move to the Kimberley to train as a guide. He leads us on a walk, encouraging us to try boab nut; they are high in vitamin C, have the same properties as antimalarial medication and can be used to make custard. It has a salty flavour, similar to popcorn. At El Questro Wilderness Parks Zebedee Springs, there are soaring orange sandstone cliffs; tiny frogs hop along rocks while dragonflies float above and butterflies twitter around us in what appears to be a courtship ritual. The thermal springs are a series of rock pools linked by tiny waterfalls with water as clear as glass, the springs are a true oasis. The Kimberley is a bird lovers paradise but the thing I will remember most are the colours dusty orange roads, towering red rock escarpments, black bushfire-charred eucalyptus trees and bright yellow capok flowers against clear blue skies. The writer was a guest of APT. lamb cutlets and vegetables before mustering around the campfire. Buster, the camps adopted dog from the neighbouring Kandiwal community, nestles at my feet. A few nights earlier, Gavins pregnant wife, Lucie, who also works at the camp, had been walking home through the bushes with Buster when he IAM woken by the morning light and the first sounds of the day: birds singing in the trees, the zipping and unzipping of surrounding tents and the jovial banter of other guests making their way to breakfast. Im warm and cosy under the blanket in my luxury tent but the cold air pierces my exposed cheeks. This is the Kimberley, however, and things change quickly. A few hours later, Im hiking under a scorching sun behind indigenous guide Gavin en route to Mitchell Falls. We pass a sacred burial site and climb down to a cave to see Aboriginal rock art depicting, among other things, a longneck turtle, kangaroos, fish, yams and a handprint that belonged to Gavins grandfather, a respected elder of the Wnanbal people. Gavin points out a cool part of the cave where his ancestors would carve spears. We stop to fill our bottles at an overhanging rock behind a waterfall where ferns grow through the cracks. Continuing our walk towards Big Merten Falls, we pause to learn about cinchona trees, from which our lands traditional owners extracted quinine to cure toothaches. We scramble up and down rocks and have to take our shoes off to cross a river, hopping from boulder to boulder. Mitchell Falls is the highest tiered waterfall in Western Australia and, on first view, stops me in my tracks. Water cascades down into a collection of pools. It is a truly magnificent sight. Swimming at Mitchell Falls is forbidden the site is sacred and legend says it is home to two creation snakes. However, a refreshing dip is taken at a nearby pool with a small waterfall. As we wait for the helicopter to take us on the short flight back to our 4WD, a cute spotted quoll scurries in between rocks nearby, lying in wait to feast on our crumbs. Upon returning to Mitchell Falls Wilderness Lodge a tranquil camp beside an emerald green billabong were welcomed with glasses of bubbly in celebration of fellow APT guest Wendys 50th birthday. That night, we dine on crocodile, emu and kangaroo canapes followed by a dinner of WESTERN AUSTRALIA Falling for outback wonders In the rugged Kimberley, Angela Saurine hikes to waterfalls, gorges and cattle stations along the Gibb River Road GETTING THERE Qantas flies to Broome from Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth. Ph 13 13 13 or see qantas.com TOURING THERE APTs 15-day Kimberley Complete small-group 4WD adventure is priced from $8395 a person. Most accommodation is in semipermanent tents, with wooden floorboards and corrugated iron walls separating the bathroom at APT-operated camps. Most meals are also included, with duck, barramundi and turkey among the impressive dinnertime offerings in such remote locations. A rotating seat system is enforced throughout the tour so you dont have people rushing to be first on the bus to snaffle the best seats. APT also provides a torch, water bottle, backpack and a small travel towel. Ph 1300 196 420 or see kimberleywilderness.com.au STAYING THERE Spend an extra night before or after your tour at Cable Beach Club Resort and Spa, overlooking Cable Beach in Broome, where the tour starts and ends. Ph 1800 199 099 or see cablebeachclub.com WHEN TO GO The best time to visit is during the dry season from May to August when you can expect clear blue skies and sunshine during the day and cool nights. australiasnorthwest.com GO2 THE KIMBERLEY


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