Territory Stories

Arts backbone

Details:

Title

Arts backbone

Creator

Association of the Northern, Kimberley and Arnhem Aboriginal Artists

Collection

Arts backbone; E-Journals; PublicationNT; Arts backbone

Date

2014-08-01

Location

Darwin

Notes

This publication contains many links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Language

English

Subject

Association of The Northern, Kimberley and Arnhem Aboriginal Artists; Arnhem, Northern and Kimberley Artists Aboriginal Corporation; Art, Australian; Aboriginal Australians; Aboriginal Artists; Periodicals

Publisher name

Association of the Northern, Kimberley and Arnhem Aboriginal Artists

Place of publication

Darwin

Series

Arts backbone

Volume

volume 14 issue 1, August 2014

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

Association of the Northern, Kimberley and Arnhem Aboriginal Artists

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00042

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/253922

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/534657

Page content

Australian Indigenous Fashion Week 2014, Sydney Praxie and my work placement. By Evangeline Cameron, Djilpin Arts, ANKAAA AWEP 2013 Graduate ANKAAA Arts Worker Extension Program 2013 Graduates, Evangeline Cameron, Djilpin Arts and Praxedes Tipungwuti, Tiwi Design attended the Australian Indigenous Fashion Week, 2014 with Belinda Foster, ANKAAA. Travel was made possible through a Quick Response Grant of the Regional Arts Fund, Arts NT. Praxie and myself had many different jobs to do at the fashion show in Sydney. First we had to pack all the show bags with little biscuits and little shampoos and conditioner and moisturiser. We had to lay all the outfits out and label them with the models names, ready for them to change into really fast. We helped dress the models, zip up their dresses and get the right earrings, bracelets and shoes together for them. We had to really focus when we were out the back. It was so busy. There were people everywhere and everyone had a different job. There was a photographer taking pictures of each model just before they went out on the catwalk. There was a person doing make up. I would love to learn how to do the make up. Top left: Djilpin Arts stall at AIFW (L-R) Lancetta Ashley, Rachel Palmer and Evangeline Cameron Photo: ANKAAA Top: Evangeline and Praxie with two of the models at AIFW Photo: ANKAAA Above: Tiwi Design stall at AIFW, funded through ANKAAAs TADS program Photo: Tiwi Design We also answered questions during a press conference on how the dresses and fabrics were made and how people get the local colours to make the natural dyes for the pandanus. We also worked on our own Art Centre stalls. We were able to watch the first fashion show but for the second show we had to be out the back helping. It was really good fun and I would love to do it again next year. Injalak Arts at Fashion Week. By Felicity Wright, Mentor Manager Artists Selina Nadjowh and Priscilla Badari travelled from Gunbalanya, West Arnhem Land to Sydney for the inaugural Australian Indigenous Fashion Week, April 2014 held at the Sydney Town Hall. Both women were excited about the flight and first trip to Sydney. Selina got the window seat and watched the changing landscape beneath her for the whole flight. And it was Priscillas first trip on a jet. Injalaks collaborations with Darwin based Albertini designer Adriana Dent and Cambodian NGO design collective Artisandesigner saw the creation of a number of runway outfits. The garments featured fabric designs by Selina Nadjowh, Reuben Manakgu, Isaiah Nagurrgurrba, Maath Maralngurra and Geoffrey Nabegeyo. Womens and mens clothing and accessories made from hand-printed Top: Injalak Dress. Selina Nadjowh and Priscilla Badari with Albertinis ball gown. The full skirt of Selinas Lambalk (Sugarglider) design drew rounds of applause from the audience Photo: ANKAAA Above: Injalak designs on the runway at AIFW Photo: Injalak Arts Babbarra designs at Fashion Week. By Claire Nicholl, Manager, Babbarra Designs, Maningrida Womens Centre In April this year, Babbarra Designs was invited to present at Sydneys inaugural Australian Indigenous Fashion Weeks Design Forum Creative Lab Sessions. An overarching theme for the forum was the building of ethical frameworks for design collaborations between fashion designers and Indigenous fabric producers. The women from Babbarra Designs spoke about their collaboration with Sydney Indigenous designer Caressa Sengstock. A collaboration sponsored by Spotlight Australia. The collection was shown on the runway at AIFW. It was the first time Raylene Bonson and Lenny Goya-Airra of Babbarra Designs had travelled to Sydney. They showed great courage speaking to a room full of fashion aficionados and media. They spoke about their work as a textile artist and textile machinist, and the importance of the sustainability of their employment for them and their families into the future. The Babbarra Designs sewing team is using the patterns created during the collaboration to produce items for sale. These are available at The Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair in August. The trip was funded through ANKAAAs Training and Development Support Program (TADS). Top: Artists, Raylene Bonson and Lenny GoyaAirra with Babbarra Designs manager, Claire Nicholl at the Babbarra Designs stall, AIFW Photo: Babbarra Designs Above left: Babbarra Designs speaking at the Design Forum Creative Lab Sessions at AIFW. (L-R) Caressa Sengstock, Claire Nicholl, Raylene Bonson and Lenny Goya-Airra Photo: ANKAAA Above: Babbarra Designs on the runway Photo: Hamish Gregory Injalak fabrics are now available through the Art Centre. www.injalak.com/online-store 12 Arts BackBone evenT newS Volume 14: Issue 1, August 2014 Volume 14: Issue 1, August 2014 evenT newS Arts BackBone 13


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