Territory Stories

Wave Hill handover

Details:

Title

Wave Hill handover

Creator

Wesley-Smith, Rob; Rowlings, Bill

Collection

Territory Times Gone By; StoryNT

Date

2014-11-24

Location

Wave Hill

Description

Rob Wesley-Smith was one of the few people present with a camera to capture the key gesture of the formal hand-back of 3236 sq km of Gurindji lands in the Northern Territory to their leader, Vincent Lingiari, 38 years ago.

File type

application/pdf

Use

StoryNT Agreement

Access

View only under StoryNT agreement

Related links

https://www.cla.asn.au/News/photos-of-two-giants-drinking/ [Photos of two giants, drinking]

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/253065

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/539135

Page content

Rob was too busy playing providore to take these shots: it was his bottle of champagne, which he thoughtfully brought along to celebrate the historic event. I handed the bottle to Gough, who went to drink from it, but then stopped and politely handed the bottle to Vincent first. He took a modest sip, then handed it back to Gough who took a swig. Rob, noted East Timor activist and a CLA member, still lives in Darwin. In 1975, he was based there as an agricultural adviser with the NT Government, traveling thousands of kilometres to stations throughout the Territory. He attended the handover ceremony as a supporter and friend of the Gurindji in general, and personal friend of Vincent and his wife Blanche Nangi in particular. The land hand-back, a lease, was negotiated by the Australian Government with the British company, Vesteys, as the closing scene at the end of a nine-year strike. The ceremony featured in the photographs was effectively the first formal public acknowledgement of Aboriginal land rights by the Australian Government.


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

We use temporary cookies on this site to provide functionality.
By continuing to use this site without changing your settings, you consent to our use of cookies.