Territory Stories

Botulism Poisoning in Cattle in the Northern Territory

Details:

Title

Botulism Poisoning in Cattle in the Northern Territory

Other title

Agnote

Creator

Fitzpatrick, S.

Issued by

Northern Territory. Department of Regional Development, Primary Industry, Fisheries and Resources

Collection

Serial No. 651; Agdex No. 420/654; Agnote; E-Journals; PublicationNT; Agnote

Date

2006-12

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Language

English

Subject

Agriculture; Weeds; Biological control; Animals; Farm animals; Periodicals

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Berrimah

Series

Agnote

Volume

No: K29, September 2006

File type

application/pdf

ISSN

0157-8243

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Northern Territory Government

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/252490

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/543817

Page content

Northern Territory Government Page 6 of 6 Calves Vaccination of calves can occur from one month of age to produce effective immunity. Protective maternal antibody levels are depleted by six months of age. Properties conducting early weaning (60 kg+) programs should ensure that vaccination occurs at this early age. Imported cattle Often the vaccination history of imported cattle is overlooked. Botulism vaccination should take place along with other vaccinations before cattle are released into the herd. Vaccine program failures do occur and it is important to store and administer the vaccine carefully. Please read manufacturer instructions prior to use for storage, handling and vaccine program recommendations. Station storage should be in a cool room at 4C and at the yards in the shade in eskies with ice. Injection equipment including disposable items should be kept clean and well maintained or replaced. Vaccine should be injected under the skin on the neck or behind the shoulder. Vaccine reactions can occur. This is often the result of injecting the vaccine into the skin or into the muscle. It is important to avoid sites close to the rumen, particularly the rumen fossa (triangular area under the hip) as the vaccine is destroyed if injected into the rumen. Supplementation The supplementation of non-protein nitrogen (e.g. urea) and phosphorous is a well recognised management practice. However, even the best supplementation programs will not completely prevent carcass or bone chewing. Carcass removal Removal of carcasses is not always an option under extensive range conditions where paddocks are large and the checking of stock is infrequent. However, the removal of all carcasses from areas of stock congregation (e.g. watering points) is important. Carcasses can be burnt, buried, locked up in the turkey nest enclosure or at least taken a considerable distance away. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This Agnote updates and replaces the original produced by Kevin DeWitte in 1996. Please visit us at our website: www.nt.gov.au/d Department of Regional Development, Primary Industry, Fisheries and Resources Northern Territory Government ISSN 0157-8243 Serial No. 651 Agdex No. 420/654 Disclaimer: While all care has been taken to ensure that information contained in this document is true and correct at the time of publication, the Northern Territory of Australia gives no warranty or assurance, and makes no representation as to the accuracy of any information or advice contained in this publication, or that it is suitable for your intended use. No serious, business or investment decisions should be made in reliance on this information without obtaining independent and/or professional advice in relation to your particular situation. i Department of Primary Industry, Fisheries and Mines. Pastoral Industry Survey NT 2004. Northern Territory Government. ii Department of Primary Industry, Fisheries and Mines. Pastoral Industry Survey NT 2004. Northern Territory Government.