Territory Stories

NintiNews : Innovation for Remote Australia

Details:

Title

NintiNews : Innovation for Remote Australia

Other title

Ninti One

Collection

Ninti One news; E-Journals; PublicationNT

Date

2014-02-01

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Rural development -- Australia -- Periodicals; Community development -- Australia -- Periodicals

Publisher name

Ninti One

Place of publication

Alice Springs

File type

application/pdf

Copyright owner

Ninti One Pty Ltd

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/250932

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/552091

Page content

Back to Top Remote Education Our Remote Education Systems project aims to find out how remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities can best benefit from the teaching and learning happening in and out of schools. It is doing this by engaging with members of communities, schools, government agencies and others who want to find ways of improving outcomes for students in remote Australia. The project is now about halfway through its five year period. At this point, with quite a lot of data already collected and analysed, our focus is shifting towards applying what we have learned from our research to remote education policy and practice. Recent highlights include: About 80 people from across the NT gathered in Alice Springs to hear three Anangu educators - Karina Lester, Katrina Tjitayi, and Makinti Minutjukur - and RES project researcher, Sam Osborne explore the practical implications of what they call a Red Dirt Curriculum. Key topics were "What knowledge matters for young people in the remote APY lands of remote NW South Australia?" and, "What would a contextualised, 'red dirt' curriculum look like if we re-imagine the core elements of a remote education?" Our look at the 2011 Census suggests there is more to economic participation than completing Year 12 and getting certificates linked to jobs. There appears to be no shortage of jobsand no educational reason why many Aboriginal people cannot engage in the existing economies in very remote Australia. So why is there Subscribe Past Issues RSSShare Translate NintiNews February 2014 http://us5.campaign-archive2.com/?u=db0c44a0a4db4cce9a3dccec0&i... 6 of 13 21/02/2014 1:02 PM


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