Territory Stories

Vollie news

Details:

Title

Vollie news

Creator

St John Ambulance Australia (NT) Inc.

Collection

Vollie News; E-Journals; PublicationNT; Vollie News

Date

2014-05-15

Notes

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

St. John Ambulance Australia (N.T.); Periodicals

Publisher name

St. John Ambulance Australia (N.T.)

Place of publication

Darwin

Series

Vollie News

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

St. John Ambulance Australia (N.T.)

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2021C00044

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/250372

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/558086

Page content

Vollie News Thursday 15th May 2014 Page 6 It is with sadness that we report the recent passing of old-time members Bill Burton and Bob Brennan. Bill Burton was a member of Darwin Combined Division pre Cyclone Tracy, having joined on 6th June 1967. Bob Brennan joined Darwin Combined Division before Cyclone Tracy and held the following offices: Warrant Officer Grade II 1 October 1975 (Corps Sergeant Major) Officer Administering Command Casuarina Combined Division, May 1976 Superintendent Casuarina Combined Division, August 1976 Corps Superintendent Northern Corps, 1 July 1980 Resigned/retired during 1981 The following comments are from Facebook: Beth Dianne Shepherd: RIP Bob Brennan, I have fond memories of working volunteer shifts with "Father Bob" as we referred to him. He was a quiet achiever, and a lovely man to work with. Condolences to his family Graem Harding: Fond memories of Bob. Was a great leader and mentor. RIP. Pat King: Yes, a wonderful example, true gentleman and just a lovely man. This story was published in Vollie News, 25 April 2013 Know your environment! Lesley King Bob Brennan was the Divisional Superintendent of Casuarina Combined Division when I first joined St. John. Bob was also the master of the tug Goyder, and a very competent one at that. As a result the Division had the benefit of his experience and ability which ensured that his members were always in ship shape in respect of training for any eventuality. Bob organized frequent exercises for his group which addressed a number of potential scenarios that could challenge us should the need arise a light plane coming down on Bagot Road (which nearly did happen once!), a road train tipping over and spilling hazardous chemicals, a school bus accident, a school laboratory explosionetc. The exercise always involved those of us who were Ambulance trained (radio procedure, handover of patients, etc.) so no one missed out. I was on ambulance duty one evening when one of Bobs exercises materialized. We were called to the wharf to attend a crew member who had fallen down a ladder into the engine room of a boat and wouldnt you know it? The boat was the Goyder. Well, we boarded the tug from the wharf and were taken down several levels via ladders into the bowels of the little ship. Not an easy climb with a full ambo kit to manage. There was the casualty crumpled up on the floor. Unconscious. Head injury. One leg hooked under him. Possible spinal. I was shown where he had fallen from basically the 3 levels above where I had just climbed down a straight fall of about 25-30ft from an open hatch onto a steel floor. I asked the driver to bring down the scoop stretcher and started my assessment. Well as you can imagine it took some time baseline obs, levels of consciousness, response, attend to the injury, check the leg for fractures, stabilize the neck and spine and get the man onto the scoop and strapped securely. Then organize the crew to get a line down through the open hatch to extricate the casualty to the deck for transfer to the ambulance. Must have been the best part of an hour and a half or 2 hours down that hole, but we made it onto the deck eventually feeling quite pleased with ourselves only to find that the tide had turned and the boat was now about 15ft below the wharf access steps! I cannot remember how we overcame that one but it was lesson in tidal movements that was well learned, and we were evermore aware of the potential difficulties of quayside retrievals. Only a tug captain would have thought of that one! https://www.facebook.com/beth.d.shepherd?fref=ufi https://www.facebook.com/graem.harding?fref=ufi https://www.facebook.com/pat.king.98622?fref=ufi


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