Territory Stories

TogArt Contemporary Art Exhibition

Details:

Title

TogArt Contemporary Art Exhibition

Collection

TogArt Contemporary Art Exhibition; PublicationNT; E-Journals

Date

2012

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Notes

TOGA Contemporary Art Award 2012 catalogue

Language

English

Subject

Art, Modern -- 21st Century -- Northern Territory -- Exhibitions; Art, Australian -- Northern Territory -- Exhibitions

Publisher name

TOGA Group

Place of publication

Darwin

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/249142

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/566442

Page content

When the kids were little we scored an amazing $5 camp box from a lawn sale. It was pretty massive and bulky and stored everything needed for a bush camp. It fitted neatly into the boot of the beamer with the tent, eskie and these groovy swags we bought from an army disposal joint. Darwin is hot, so to find a place with a swimming hole was high on our agenda. We would head down to Litchfield National Park straight after school on a Friday, have some dinner and then a swim by sunset. The kids loved it. They would play marbles in the dust and haul wood to the fire. Initially we would head to Wangi falls and sometimes we would be the only ones there. One time, very late in the afternoon, we witnessed a womens business mermaid dance. Given that we are all girls we were allowed to stay. Very special! Over the years Wangi became busy and we started venturing out to Pethericks and Walker Creek, lugging that camp box for kilometers to get to thatidyllic location. It was totally worth it and as the kids got older we tackled Buley and Florence Falls. Sometimeswe were able to camp at the Rangers Environment Camp. Although Litchfield National Park is pretty huge, I felt like I knew the place like the back of my hand or my own backyard. Thanks Girls! X Biography Linda Joy is a Darwin based arts educator and practicing visual artist. From a young age she was inspired by oil painting and photography, studying the latter at the Queensland College of Art in the early eighties. Joy moved to the Territory in 1994, got stuck and is likely to spend the rest of her life there. She furthered her practice in printmaking and painting through a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Northern Territory University and completed a Bachelor of Education, culminating in her position as Senior Arts Teacher at a local middle school. She has been the administrator of Darwin Visual Arts Association, exhibited her work in numerous group and solo exhibitions in the Northern Territory as well as elsewhere in Australia and has been the recipient of several art awards. In amongst this she invested all her time and creative energy inraising her three brilliant, beautiful daughters. Her artistic journey is underpinned by her journals. These are extensive reflections of not only her Australian and international travels, but also the development of her love for ink and charcoal. Withher daughters having flown the coop recently, she enjoys a few luxuries, including spare time, peace, quiet and bedrooms which can be converted to studios. Hence her arts practice has taken on anew life and direction. Linda Joy Litchfield Ink on canvas / 75 x 100 cm 56


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