Territory Stories

Wire : fortnightly news in brief from Jabiru, Gunbalanya, Maningrida, Warruwi and Minjilang

Details:

Title

Wire : fortnightly news in brief from Jabiru, Gunbalanya, Maningrida, Warruwi and Minjilang

Other title

The West Arnhem Wire

Creator

West Arnhem Shire Council

Collection

Wire : fortnightly news in brief from Jabiru, Gunbalanya, Maningrida, Warruwi and Minjilang; E-Journals; PublicationNT; Wire : fortnightly news in brief from Jabiru, Gunbalanya, Maningrida, Warruwi and Minjilang

Date

2013-10-31

Location

Jabiru

Notes

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers; West Arnhem Region; Arnhem Land (N.T.); Newspapers; Periodicals

Publisher name

West Arnhem Shire Council

Place of publication

Jabiru

Series

Wire : fortnightly news in brief from Jabiru, Gunbalanya, Maningrida, Warruwi and Minjilang

Volume

Edition 304, 31 October 2013

Previously known as

The West Arnhem Wire

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

West Arnhem Shire Council

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/247787

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/574509

Page content

West Arnhem Wire - Fortnightly news in brief from Jabiru, Gunbalanya, Maningrida, Warruwi and Minjilang 8 The West Arnhem Wire | 31 October 2013 Lampalk (Lambalk) are small marsupials that live in trees. They can be seen at night gliding from tree to tree or, if you have good eyes, you can spot them amongst the leaves and branches where they are eating. They eat a lot of different types of food, including insects, sap, gum and nectar and sometimes even eat lizards and small birds. They live in groups and may call to each other with a yapping sound, like a small dog. Currently Lampalk are recognised by science as a subspecies of the Sugar Glider (i.e. Petaurus breviceps ariel) whose distribution is restricted to the Top End and its offshore islands. However, recent genetic studies of a few gliders from the Northern Territory showed they were more closely related to the Squirrel Glider or Mahogany Glider. This was a big surprise to the scientists as neither of these species is currently known to live in the Territory! It is important to find out which species we have here and exactly what their habitat requirements are said Dr MontagueDrake. Over the past decade, populations of terrestrial native mammals have been in decline across the Top End of the Northern Territory. However, surveys monitoring this decline have not specifically targeted arboreal (tree-dwelling) mammals, such as gliders. We will be trapping gliders and other arboreal marsupials in Kakadu National Park across a range of habitats. No animals will be harmed. We will also be sourcing glider specimens from across the Top End. For instance, we have a few specimens that were killed by domestic cats or cars. We have also been given glider tails. These tails have been snipped off by large owls, which are a common predator of small gliders. We will also be reanalysing Northern Territory glider specimens from museums and other collections. If you find a dead Lampalk or a Lampalk tail, please contact Rebecca- she would really love to hear from you! The researchers would kindly appreciate if readers of the Wire could pass this message onto family and friends who are regularly out on country. You can call Rebecca on 0419 614 427, drop in and see her at the Charles Darwin University office in Jabiru or email her at Rebecca. montague-drake@cdu.edu.au. GOING ON A GLIDER HUNT What species are Lampalk Gliders and where do they live? Does more than one type of Lampalk occur in the Northern Territory? So, which species are Lampalk Gliders? A new project by Charles Darwin University researchers, Professor Sue Carthew and Dr Rebecca Montague-Drake, in association with Kakadu National Park, hopes to answer these and other questions. Words and photos thanks to Charles Darwin University. JABIRU SPORTS & SOCIAL CLUB AGM NOVEMBER29TH7:30PM ATTHEJABIRUSPORTS&SOCIALCLUB LAKESIDEDRIVEJABIRU ORDEROFBUSINESS *CONSIDERATIONOFACCOUNTSANDREPORTSOFTHECOMMITTEE *THEELECTIONOFCOMMITTEEMEMBERS


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