Territory Stories

Annual report 2008, Menzies School of Health Research

Details:

Title

Annual report 2008, Menzies School of Health Research

Other title

Menzies School of Health Research annual report 2008; 2008 Menzies School of Health annual report

Creator

Menzies School of Health Research

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT; Menzies School of Health Research annual report; Annual Report

Date

2008-12-31

Location

Tiwi

Abstract

Through scientifi c excellence, education and research the team at Menzies is discovering ways to reduce the impact of disease and improve the health and well-being of people living in Australia and beyond. -- page 4

Notes

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; Charles Darwin University; Discovery for a healthy tomorrow

Table of contents

Who we are and what we do page 4 -- Where and how we work page 5 -- Menzies Strategic Plan page 6 -- Vision page 7 -- Values page 7 -- Goals page 7 -- The Year at a Glance page 8 -- Financial and Corporate Overview page 12 -- A Message from the Chair page 14 -- A Message from the Director page 16 -- A Message from the Indigenous Development Unit page 18 -- Child Health Division page 21 -- Healing and Resilience Division page 27 -- International Health Division page 33 -- Preventable Chronic Diseases Division page 39 -- Services, Systems and Society Division Page 45 -- Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division page 51 -- Education and Training Division page 57 -- Corporate Services Division page 63 -- Menzies and the Community page 71 -- Governance page 72 -- Honorary Appointees page 75 -- Research Funding page 76 -- Publications page 84 -- Professional Activities page 92 -- Collaborators page 96 -- page 3

Language

English

Subject

Menzies School of Health Research; Medicine; Research; Annual report

Publisher name

Menzies School of Health Research

Place of publication

Tiwi

Series

Menzies School of Health Research annual report; Annual Report

Volume

2008

Format

99 pages : colour illustration ; 30 cm.

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

Menzies School of Health Research

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2021C00047

Related links

https://www.menzies.edu.au/ [Menzie School of Health Research website]

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/247612

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/575405

Page content

Highlights of 2008 The establishment of a dedicated Substance misuse unit within the Division and the appointment of Dr Kate Senior as its head. This new unit will enhance the capacity of Menzies to respond to key issues in substance misuse including evaluation of Alcohol management plans and development of new understanding related to such communitywide interventions. This unit has strong partnership with the NT Government and is well positioned to infl uence policy and practice. Publication of two educational fl ipcharts titled When Boys and Men Sniff and When Girls and Women Sniff. Over 500 Aboriginal adults and adolescents were assessed using CogState computerised cognitive assessment. The Strong Souls assessment of social and emotional wellbeing was developed and validated for use with Indigenous Australians. The assessment of 72 ex-petrol sniffers and healthy controls, over 10 years since the baseline research was conducted. Increasing national interest in the AIMHI training and research fi ndings as shown by signifi cant increases in invited presentation and media activity throughout the year. The year saw the winding down of the AIMHI project as funding came to an end. It also saw the development of proposals to allow the various elements of AIMHI continue beyond the life of the funding. The duration of the AIMHI project saw employment of eight Indigenous people with AIMHI NT over the fi ve years. The results of a randomised controlled trial in two remote communities suggest that motivational care planning (MCP) is an effective treatment for Indigenous people with mental illness and comorbidity. Evaluation of training of 259 service providers in the course of 17 workshops using the tools developed through the AIMHI story telling project was highly positive. Dr Kate Senior and Dr Richard Chenhalls paper Lukumbat marawana: a changing pattern of drug use by youth in a remote Aboriginal community, received national media attention and resulted in a change to NT Government Policy regarding substance misuse. Publications The Division published 10 papers during 2008. Highlights included (a full list of Divisional publications can be found on page 84): Nagel T, Thompson C, Spencer N. Challenges to relapse prevention: psychiatric care of Indigenous in-patients. Australian e-Journal for Advancement of Mental Health 2008; 7(2). Nagel T. Thesis: Relapse prevention in Indigenous mental health. 2008, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University: Darwin. Nagel T. Motivational care planning. Australian Family Physician, 2008. 37(12): p. 996-1001. Nagel T, et al. An approach to treatment of mental illness and substance dependence in remote Indigenous communities: results of a mixed methods study. Australian Journal of Rural Health. Accepted November 2008. Nagel T, et al. Two way approaches to Indigenous mental health literacy. Aust Journal of Primary Health, Accepted December 2008. Senior K, Chenhall R D. Walkin about at night: The background to teenage pregnancy in a remote Aboriginal community. Journal of Youth Studies, 2008; 11(3): 269-282. Chenhall R D. Whats in a rehab? Ethnographic evaluation research in Indigenous residential alcohol and drug rehabilitation centres. Anthropology and Medicine, 2008; 15(2): 91-104. Senior K, Chenhall R D. Lukumbat marawana: A changing pattern of drug use by youth in a remote Aboriginal community. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 2008; 16(2): 72-9. 29Healing and Resilience Division


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