Territory Stories

Sunday Territorian 23 Dec 2012

Details:

Title

Sunday Territorian 23 Dec 2012

Collection

Sunday Territorian; NewspaperNT

Date

2012-12-23

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/243745

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/601260

Page content

12 Sunday Territorian. Sunday, December 23, 2012. www.sundayterritorian.com.au P U B : N T N E W S D A T E : 2 3 -D E C -2 0 1 2 P A G E : 1 2 C O L O R : C M Y K Fresh Organic Produce Organic Fruit & Veg Local Produce Dry Goods Hair & Body care Dairy Organic Meats Herbs & Spices Snacks Health Products Home Delivery PLUS LOTS MORE! Phone: 8985 1922 Shop 12 Trower Rd Rapid Creek Open 7 days www.greeniesrealfood.com.au 1 0 7 9 9 7 9 nic Produce 8981 6365 , ! . 1 0 2 7 8 4 5 s 7am till 7pm s 7 DAYS www.beatbadenergy.com.au POWER BILLS RISING? UP TO 30%... 1800 BEAT BAD (08) 8947 1841 Beat Bad Energy Nt Elec Lic c2792 Qld Elec Lic 73782 Official Supplier We can fix that forever FREE Home Energy Assessment that could save you thousands! NEWS sundayterritorian.com.au Boy dies on holiday hiking trip A FOURTEEN-year-old boy from Scotland has died while on a hiking trip with his father in Western Australias northwest. The teenager, who arrived in the country in mid-December, became dehydrated while walking along Badjirrajirra Creek, 20km south of Exmouth, on Friday. He collapsed about four hours into the hike with little water or shade. Temperatures in the region were well above 40C. He was rushed to Exmouth Hospital by ambulance but died on Friday evening. Pollution laws fall short By ALYSSA BETTS Call to action after no penalty for spillsAUTHORITIES knew the Northern Territorys pollution laws werent up to scratch before the Edith River train derailment in December last year. The former government was prompted to propose amendments after a raft of pollution incidents in 2010 the year Darwin Port was caught spilling copper concentrate into the harbour. But the amendments never made it. And last week Territorians learned the Environment Protection Authority decided no legal action would be taken against companies involved in the derailment. While 1200 tonnes of copper concentrate classified federally as hazardous were spilled into the river, the EPA said there was no evidence of actual harm to the environment. Environment Centre NT spokesman Dr Stuart Blanch said it proved how weak the NT laws were. If you cant prosecute someone for tipping 1200 tonnes of hazardous substance which contains copper, ar senic, silica and some uranium into the river, well, we may as well rip up the law, he said. Dr Blanch said the problem was the Waste Management and Pollution Control Acts requirement that harm be caused before prosecution could be launched. He added: In other (states) laws, it doesnt matter if you find dead fish floating down the river or not, if you spill listed declared hazardous goods into a river or harbour, it satisfies the legal definition of pollution. In the aftermath of the Darwin Harbour scandals, the then Environment Department put out a summary paper to explain proposed amendments to the Act after concerns about its functionality and enforceability. The ... Government has recognised that the existing WMPCA Act needs to be amended to address these concerns, it said at the time. Neither Environment Minister Peter Chandler nor the Labor Party were available for an interview on Friday on where they now stood on the laws. Draftsman Brendan Dillon says the festive season is an awesome time to be single Picture: PATRINA MALONE Tis the season for singles to revel in their freedom By ELLIE TURNER BRENDAN Dillon is single. The 22-year-old draftsman said there was no better time than the festive season to be free of the relationship shackles. Youve got to get among it while you can, he said. Hailing from Melbourne, Mr Dillon who now lives at Gunn, in Palmerston said he flew back down south to celebrate the single life with a Brazen Models agency Christmas party last week. I was half-naked in a Santa costume, giving girls lap dances, he said. It doesnt get much better than that. The NTFL Waratahs reserves player said he was back in the Top End and ready to party through the New Year. And he had a few words of wisdom for single guys and dolls who had just migrated north and left mates behind. I barely knew anyone when I got here but just get out and about, talk to people thats what I did, he said. Peak break-up season has hit the nation with a vengeance. The rate of people ditching their better half has doubled, a study of more than 10,000 Facebook status updates revealed. Casual dating site Forget Dinner.com.au spokesman Howard James said the top reasons for festive break-ups were people not wanting to spend cash on Christmas presents and reluctance to meet the in-laws. Bodies found amid ashes POLICE are treating as suspicious the deaths of an elderly couple whose bodies were found in a Melbourne house after a fire yesterday. A neighbour raised the alarm after seeing the flames on Morven St in Yarraville just after 3am. Emergency services found the bodies of a man and a woman believed to be in their late 70s or early 80s. The incident was described by Detective Inspector John Potter as gruesome. Were treating it as a suspicious death, he said. Police believe the fire was deliberately lit. Protection for investors MUM and dad investors will be better protected under new financial regulations being looked at by the Federal Government. Financial regulators will work together in the new year to examine moves to strengthen the regulation of companies that issue bonds to retail investors. The regulators include the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) and the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority. A significant aim is to produce initiatives that restore investor confidence.


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