Territory Stories

Katherine rural review

Details:

Title

Katherine rural review

Creator

Northern Territory. Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries

Collection

Katherine rural review; E-Journals; PublicationNT; Katherine rural review

Date

2012-11

Location

Katherine

Notes

Date:2012-11; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Agriculture; Northern Territory; Katherine; Periodicals; Animal industry; Rural industries; Periodicals

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Katherine

Series

Katherine rural review

Volume

no. 311

File type

application/pdf

ISSN

0394-9823

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Northern Territory Government

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/242841

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/604634

Page content

Page 2 of 20 Katherine Rural Review, Issue 311 achieved as well as a different outlet for their cattle. Troy Setter, Chief Operating Officer of AACo, provided a very positive and open presentation about the marketing options AACo have explored over the last 12 months. He explained that while the company requires regular planned income from sales, they are also required to be flexible and adaptable to market changes and currency fluctuations. Troy then went through the extensive enterprises and businesses which make up AACo including using a number of different breeds in their systems, live export, feedlotting and branded boxed beef, explaining it is all about managing risk, managing margins and making sure all of AACos eggs are not in one basket. One of the largest drivers to improved productivity and profitability in the AACo business is from the development of the AACo composite cattle. Troy was very positive about the future of the northern beef industry, citing the projected population increase in south-east Asia and the industrys position to continue to supply these markets. Troy, Steve and Val all acknowledged that the next few years are likely to be tough for northern producers heavily exposed to Indonesian Live Export. Val Dyer of Hayfield Station provided an insight into the workings of their business. Hayfield carries between 15,000 20,000 head on 2,750 square km and have a further 2000 square km of undeveloped country. The Dyers have grown the business sustainably and conservatively through mostly self-funded development since purchase in 1974. Their current major goal is planning for succession. They run a high grade Brahman herd and believe that supplying a consistent line of high quality cattle and ensuring good delivery outcomes are essential. Their current target markets are Egypt and domestic breeder sales. While Hayfield also supplies the Indonesian feeder steer and heifer market, they retain some steers under 320kg for an additional season to suit the heavier markets such as Egypt, Philippines and Brunei. Other selling strategies employed at Hayfield include breeder heifers sold locally and to south-east Asia, PTIC cows, PTE cows, cow and calf sales, and oxen and bulls to southern processors. Overall, the feedback from the Hayfield Station Field Day was very positive with many of the participants requesting more information about these subjects. A follow-up webinar will be held focusing on cost-effective HGP strategies on Thursday, November 8, for those who were unable to attend the day, and who would like more information. To register details to participate in the webinar, log on to http://bit.ly/S6mola. Photo 1. Private client manager, Ben Maher, explains the custom feeding options available through Mort & Co. Photo 2: Val Dyer providing a thorough run through of the marketing strategies employed on Hayfield Station.


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