Territory Stories

NT trends in ecstasy and related drug markets 2011 : findings from the Ecstasy and Related Drugs Reporting System (EDRS)

Details:

Title

NT trends in ecstasy and related drug markets 2011 : findings from the Ecstasy and Related Drugs Reporting System (EDRS)

Collection

NT trends in ecstasy and related drug markets; Reports; PublicationNT

Date

2011

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Notes

Date:2011; Australian drug trends series No. 80

Language

English

Subject

Drug abuse surveys -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals; Ecstasy (Drug) -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals; Drug abuse -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals

Publisher name

National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales

Place of publication

Sydney (N.S.W)

ISBN

9780733430206

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/242182

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/610318

Page content

93 Ninety-four percent of recent OTC users reported the main brand they had used, with Nurofen Plus being the most reported (34%). Forty-nine percent of participants reported using OTC codeine for pain in the last six months, on a median of 12 days. The main medical purpose was to treat chronic non-malignant pain (51%), although a similar percent (45%) reported use for short-term pain (Table 74). Only 2% of participants reported use of OTC codeine for chronic malignant pain. Of those who had used OTC for medical purposes, the median amount of relief received from OTC codeine was 55 on a scale of 0-100. The median amount of tabs/caps taken was three. Seven percent of the NT sample reported the use of OTC codeine for non-medical purposes, on a median of four days. Of those who had ingested OTC codeine for non-medical purposes, the majority did so in order to obtain an opiate effect (substitute for heroin). The only other reason identified for use was to assist with sleep. The median amount of tabs/caps taken was three. The maximum number taken in any one session was five tabs/caps. The most common brand of OTC codeine used for non-medical purposes was Chemists Own Strong Pain Relief (27%, n=2) and Mersyndol (27%, n=2). Table 74: Over the counter codeine use and pain. 2011 (n=98) Ever used OTC codeine (%) 66 Recently used OTC codeine (%) 52 Median days used OTC codeine in the last six months* 17.5 Use OTC codeine for pain in the last six months (%) 49 (n=47) Acute/short-term 45 Chronic non-malignant 51 Chronic malignant 2 Used OTC codeine for non-medical purposes (%) 7 (n=7) To feel numb 0 To go to sleep 29 Substitute for heroin 57 Substitute for pharmacotherapy 0 Supplement pharmacotherapy 0 Other 0 Source: IDRS participant interviews * Among those who recently used ** Response could be between 0-100% # Multiple responses allowed 8.5 Injecting equipment use in the last month The 2011 IDRS survey included questions regarding the use of injecting equipment and the re-use and cleaning of a range of items used for injecting in the last month. These questions were sourced from the 2008 Australian Needle and Syringe Program Survey (ANSPS) conducted by The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales (National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, 2009). Table 75 shows types of injecting equipment used in the past month by participants in the 2008 ANSPS and the 2011 NT IDRS sample. The most frequently used needle/syringe by the NT IDRS sample in the past month was a 5ml syringe (barrel) whereas the most frequently used needle/syringe by the ANSPS sample was a 1ml needle/syringe. The 3ml syringe (barrel) was the next most frequently used injecting equipment in the past month by the NT sample (43% by the NT IDRS sample compared to 22% by the ANSPS sample).


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