Territory Stories

NT trends in ecstasy and related drug markets 2011 : findings from the Ecstasy and Related Drugs Reporting System (EDRS)

Details:

Title

NT trends in ecstasy and related drug markets 2011 : findings from the Ecstasy and Related Drugs Reporting System (EDRS)

Collection

NT trends in ecstasy and related drug markets; Reports; PublicationNT

Date

2011

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Notes

Date:2011; Australian drug trends series No. 80

Language

English

Subject

Drug abuse surveys -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals; Ecstasy (Drug) -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals; Drug abuse -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals

Publisher name

National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales

Place of publication

Sydney (N.S.W)

ISBN

9780733430206

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/242182

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/610318

Page content

99 measures such as..., (2) To what extent would you support or oppose the personal use of the following drugs being made legal? and (3) To what extent would you support or oppose the increased penalties for sale or supply of the following drugs?. Table 81 shows that the majority of participants expressed support (either support or strongly support) for all the support measures listed. Needle and Syringe Programs garnered the greatest support (100%) followed by methadone/buprenorphine maintenance programs (86%). The use of Naltrexone yielded the least support, although more than half (52%) either supported or strongly supported use of this particular pharmacotherapy. There was less consistency in responses to support legalisation of personal use of the various illicit drug groups. The vast majority of participants (90%) supported or strongly supported legalisation of personal use of cannabis. There was significant support for the legalisation of personal use of heroin (46%) but less so for methamphetamine (28%), cocaine (27%) and ecstasy (18%). The majority of participants did not support increased penalties for sale and supply of any of the illicit drug groups. Twelve percent of participants supported or strongly supported increased penalties for the sale and supply of cannabis and 30% supported or strongly supported increased penalties for the sale and supply of heroin. Over a third of participants supported or strongly supported increased penalties for the sale and supply of the other major illicit drug groups: 39% for methamphetamine and 38% for both cocaine and ecstasy. Table 81: Support and strongly support measures to reduce problems associated with heroin, for legalisation of illicit drugs and the increase of penalties for illicit drugs. 2011 (N=97) Support measures to reduce problems associated with heroin use (%) Needle syringe programs 100 Methadone/buprenorphine maintenance program 86 Treatment with drugs (not methadone) 84 Regulated injecting room 81 Trial of prescribed heroin 77 Rapid detoxification therapy 63 Use of naltrexone 52 Support legalisation (personal use) of (%) n=97 Cannabis 90 Heroin 46 Methamphetamine 28 Cocaine 27 Ecstasy 18 Support for increased penalties for sale or supply of illicit drugs (%) n=97 Cannabis 12 Heroin 30 Methamphetamine 39 Cocaine 38 Ecstasy 38 Source: IDRS participant interviews.


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